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PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY FOR CHRONIC CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY: A 4-Year Follow-up Study

Silva, Rufino M. MD, PhD*,†,**; Ruiz-Moreno, Jose M. MD, PhD; Gomez-Ulla, Francisco MD, PhD§; Montero, Javier A. MD; Gregório, Tatiana MD*,†; Cachulo, Maria L. MD*,†; Pires, Isabel A. MD*,†; Cunha-Vaz, José G.; Murta, Joaquim N. MD*,†,**

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0b013e3182670fbe
Original Study

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of standard photodynamic therapy with verteporfin at 48 months in patients with chronic central serous chorioretinopathy.

Methods: A retrospective, multicenter, interventional case series analysis in patients with chronic central serous chorioretinopathy, treated with standard photodynamic therapy, and with ≥4 years of follow-up. Evaluations were performed every 3 months in the first year, every 6 months in the second year, and thereafter annually. Optical coherence tomography was performed in all visits. Fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography were performed at baseline and thereafter as necessary. Retinal thickness on optical coherence tomography was measured manually, evaluating central macular thickness and neural retina thickness. Main outcomes included the evolution of best-corrected visual acuity, the resolution of subretinal fluid, documented with optical coherence tomography, the number of treatments, and the evaluation of neural retina thickness during the 48 months of follow-up.

Results: The study included 46 eyes of 42 patients, 38 men (90.4%) and 4 women (9.5%), with mean age of 49.19 ± 9.9 years (range, 32–70 years), and the minimal follow-up period was 48 months (mean, 56.8 ±10.3 months). Subretinal fluid was observed in all the included eyes at baseline, and 10 eyes (21.7%) had intraretinal diffuse or cystoid fluid. Concerning the mean best-corrected visual acuity, a statistically significant improvement (P < 0.01, Student t-test) was registered from 58.8 ± 18.3 letters at baseline to 66.9 ± 18.6 letters at 48th month. A complete resolution of subretinal fluid was achieved in 93.4%, and resolution of intraretinal fluid occurred in all 10 cases at 48 months. Neural retina thickness remained stable during the 48 months of follow-up (163.8 ± 47 μm at baseline and 163.8 ± 46 μm at 48 months). The mean number of treatments was 1.08 ± 0.3. No systemic or ocular side effects were registered.

Conclusion: Standard photodynamic therapy with verteporfin was effective and safe in chronic central serous chorioretinopathy treatment with a significant improvement in the long term, both anatomic and visual, without inducing additional retinal atrophy or systemic adverse effects.

Supplemental Digital Content is Available in the Text.Standard photodynamic therapy with verteporfin was effective and safe in chronic central serous chorioretinopathy treatment with a significant improvement in the long term, both anatomic and visual, without inducing additional retinal atrophy or systemic adverse effects.

*Department of Ophthalmology, Coimbra University Hospital Center (CHUC), Coimbra, Portugal

Association for Innovation and Biomedical Research on Light and Image, Coimbra, Portugal

Department of Ophthalmology Albacete Medical School, Castilla La Mancha University, Spain

§Technological Institute of Ophthalmology, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain

Department of Ophthalmology, Pio del Rio Hortega University Hospital, Valladolid, Spain

**Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.

Reprint requests: Rufino M. Silva, MD, PhD, Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital of the University of Coimbra, Praceta Mota Pinto, 3049 Coimbra, Portugal; e-mail: rufino.silva@oftalmolgia.co.pt

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The authors have no proprietary or commercial interest in any materials discussed in this article.

© The Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.