Secondary Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Share this article on:

PREVALENCE AND ASSOCIATIONS OF RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSIONS: The Central India Eye and Medical Study

Jonas, Jost B. MD*,†; Nangia, Vinay MD*; Khare, Anshu MD*; Sinha, Ajit MD*; Lambat, Sarang MD*

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0b013e318260246f
Original Study

Purpose: To determine the prevalence of retinal vein occlusions (RVOs) in rural Central India.

Methods: The population-based Central India Eye and Medical Study was performed in rural Central India and included 4,711 subjects (30 years and older). Using fundus photographs, we assessed the prevalence of branch retinal vein occlusions and central retinal vein occlusions.

Results: An RVO was detected in 38 eyes (0.42 ± 0.07%; 95% confidence interval: 0.29–0.56) of 35 subjects (0.76 ± 0.13%; 95% confidence interval: 0.50–1.01). Prevalence of branch retinal vein occlusions was 0.66% ± 0.12% per subject (95% confidence interval: 0.42%–0.90%) and of central retinal vein occlusions was 0.11% ± 0.05% per subject (95% confidence interval: 0.01%–0.21%). In binary logistic analysis, presence of RVOs was associated with higher age (P = 0.007), systolic blood pressure (P < 0.001), blood concentration of urea (P = 0.02), and narrower anterior chamber angle (P < 0.03). The RVO prevalence was not significantly (all Ps > 0.10) associated with body mass index; blood concentrations of glucose, cholesterol, high-density lipoproteins, and creatinine; presence of diabetes mellitus, tuberculosis and malaria; nutritional parameters; alcohol consumption; refractive error; and optic disk size. The age-specific prevalence rates of RVOs were 0.18% ± 0.13%, 0.29% ± 0.15%, 0.89% ± 0.34%, 1.07% ± 0.36%, 2.72% ± 0.85%, and 3.64% ± 2.55%, respectively, for decadal age groups. In two (5%) eyes, RVO had caused low vision (visual acuity <20/60 and ≥20/400).

Conclusion: In the rural agrarian low-income population of Central India, RVOs were detected in 0.8% of adults, with branch retinal vein occlusions being approximately seven times more common than central retinal vein occlusions. Main associated factors were higher age, blood pressure, urea blood concentration, and narrow chamber angle. RVOs were no major reason for visual impairment.

In the agrarian low-income population of Central India with a low mean body mass index, retinal vein occlusions were detected in 0.8% of adults, with branch retinal vein occlusions being about seven times more common than central retinal vein occlusions. Main associated factors were higher age, blood pressure, urea blood concentration and narrow chamber angle. Retinal vein occlusions were no major reason for visual impairment.

*Suraj Eye Institute, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India

Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Clinical Medicine Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany.

Reprint requests: Jost B. Jonas, MD, Universitäts-Augenklinik, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim, Germany; e-mail: jost.jonas@umm.de

The first two authors contributed equally to this work.

Supported by an unrestricted grant from Om Drishti Trust Nagpur; Heidelberg Engineering Co. Heidelberg, Germany; Rotary Sight Saver Netherlands; Orbis India; and Carl Zeiss Meditec Co., Jena, Germany. J. B. Jonas is a Consultant for Allergan, Inc; Merck & Co., Inc; Pfizer Inc; Bayer-Schering Co; CellMed AG, Alzenau, Germany; SOOFT SpA Montegiorgio, Italy; and is a patent holder with CellMed AG, Alzenau, Germany.

© The Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.