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LOW-DOSE METHOTREXATE FOR THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY: A Retrospective Analysis

Kurup, Shree K. MD*; Oliver, Armando MD; Emanuelli, Andres MD; Hau, Vincent MD; Callanan, David MD

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0b013e31825dd281
Original Study

Purpose: To evaluate the utility of oral methotrexate (MTX) for the treatment of chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR).

Methods: Retrospective review of all eyes of patients on oral MTX as treatment for chronic CSCR in three different centers. Visual acuity as well as optical coherence tomography central macular thickness and total volume parameters were analyzed. Complete blood count and serum chemistry results were monitored.

Results: Nine eyes of 9 patients treated with MTX for chronic CSCR met the criteria for analysis. Mean duration of CSCR was 28 months (range, 3–94 months). Mean starting dose of oral MTX was 7.04 mg (range, 5–10 mg), and mean final dose was 7.27 mg (range, 5–10 mg). The mean duration of treatment was 89 days. Mean visual acuity improved from 20/67 at baseline to 20/35 at 8 weeks (P < 0.01, paired t-test). Mean central macular thickness improved from 309 μm to 213 μm at 8 weeks (P < 0.01, paired t-test). Mean total macular volume improved from 8.14 to 7.21 at 8 weeks (P ≤ 0.02, paired t-test). Eighty-three percent of the patients achieved total resolution of subretinal fluid. No MTX-associated toxicity was evident.

Conclusion: Methotrexate may have a role in the treatment of chronic CSCR as evidenced by these results. A randomized controlled clinical trial is warranted to better understand the effects of MTX in these patients.

Methotrexate may have a role in the treatment of chronic central serous chorioretinopathy as evidenced by these results. A randomized controlled clinical trial is warranted to better understand the effects of methotrexate in these patients.

*Wake Forest Eye Center, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, North Carolina

Department of Ophthalmology, University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, San Juan, Puerto Rico

Texas Retina Associates, Dallas, Texas.

Reprint requests: Shree K. Kurup, MD, Wake Forest University Eye Center, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC 27157; e-mail: skurup@wfubmc.edu

Abstract accepted at the American Society of Retina Specialists 2011, Boston for oral presentation and the American Academy of Ophthalmology retina subspecialty day 2011.

The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

© The Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.