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INTRAVITREAL BEVACIZUMAB FOR CHOROIDAL NEOVASCULARIZATION ASSOCIATED WITH CHOROIDAL NEVUS

Chiang, Allen MD*; Bianciotto, Carlos MD; Maguire, Joseph I MD*; Park, Carl H MD*; Baker, Paul S MD*; Shields, Jerry A MD; Shields, Carol L MD

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0b013e31822092b7
Original Study
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Purpose: To report 10 cases of occult choroidal neovascularization (CNV) associated with choroidal nevus managed with intravitreal bevacizumab.

Methods: Interventional case series. Each nevus was examined and imaged with fluorescein angiography, B-scan ultrasonography, and optical coherence tomography. Data were retrospectively analyzed to evaluate outcomes of treatment response and visual acuity.

Results: Nine patients presented with CNV overlying a chronic choroidal nevus with a posterior margin within 1.5 mm of the foveola. In the 10th patient, the posterior margin of the nevus was located 10 mm from the foveola with extension of subretinal fluid into the macula. The CNV was subfoveolar in four cases, juxtafoveolar in two cases, and extrafoveolar in four cases. Initial visual acuity was 20/20 to 20/50 in 5, 20/60 to 20/100 in 2, and 20/200 or worse in 3 cases. Clinical features included subfoveolar fluid in nine, exudation in five, and hemorrhage in four cases. Intravitreal bevacizumab (1.25 mg/0.05 cc) was injected with regression of CNV in all 10 cases using 2 to 14 injections (median 3 injections). In 2 eyes, after therapeutic response to bevacizumab later consolidation with photodynamic therapy (juxtafoveolar CNV) (n = 1) or conventional laser (extrafoveolar CNV) (n = 1) was provided. In the remaining 8 eyes, after discontinuation of bevacizumab, there was no recurrence of CNV over mean 10.1 months. At overall mean follow-up of 22.5 months, final visual acuity decreased by 1 line in 4 cases and improved by mean of 3 lines (range, 1–8 lines) in 6 cases. There were no adverse effects from bevacizumab injections. All 10 choroidal nevi remained stable.

Conclusion: Intravitreal bevacizumab appears to be an effective treatment option for CNV secondary to choroidal nevus. In some cases, depending on the proximity of the CNV to the foveola, photodynamic therapy or conventional laser may be useful adjunctive therapy.

Intravitreal bevacizumab appears to be an effective treatment option for choroidal neovascularization secondary to choroidal nevus. In some cases, depending on the proximity of the choroidal neovascularization to the foveola, photodynamic therapy or conventional laser may be useful adjunctive therapy.

From the *Retina Service and †Ocular Oncology Service, Wills Eye Institute, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Supported by the Eye Tumor Research Foundation (to C.L.S.).

The authors have no financial interest or conflicts of interest.

Reprint requests: Carol L. Shields, MD, Wills Eye Institute, Oncology Service, 840 Walnut Street, Suite 1440, Philadelphia, PA 19107; e-mail: carol.shields@shieldsoncology.com

© The Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.