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ACQUIRED VITELLIFORM DETACHMENT IN PATIENTS WITH SUBRETINAL DRUSENOID DEPOSITS (RETICULAR PSEUDODRUSEN)

Zweifel, Sandrine A MD*†; Spaide, Richard F MD; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A MD

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0b013e3181f049bd
Original Study
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Purpose: To report a recently observed association of macular vitelliform detachment and subretinal drusenoid deposits (reticular pseudodrusen).

Methods: Clinical and multimodal imaging data of patients with acquired vitelliform lesions in association with subretinal drusenoid deposits were reviewed. Acquired vitelliform lesions were defined as subretinal accumulations of yellow material that developed in adulthood. Subretinal drusenoid deposits were diagnosed as being present if there were drusen-like accumulations that colocalized with aggregates of subretinal material as seen by multimodal imaging including spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, autofluorescence, and near-infrared imaging.

Results: Seven eyes of 6 patients with a mean age of 85 years, all of whom were white, were found to have vitelliform material in association with subretinal drusenoid deposits. The median visual acuity was 20/30. The vitelliform material was hyperautofluorescent and was in all eyes located in the subretinal space between the inner segment/outer segment junction and the retinal pigment epithelium. This material had the same color, autofluorescence, and optical coherence tomographic characteristics as the vitelliform material seen in association with cuticular drusen.

Conclusion: Acquired vitelliform lesions can occur in association with subretinal drusenoid deposits. Subretinal drusenoid deposits might be mistaken for cuticular drusen because of their similar appearance in color fundus photography but can be easily distinguished with multimodal imaging because they lie above the retinal pigment epithelium. Subretinal drusenoid deposits may reflect abnormalities in the function of the retinal pigment epithelium and their presence may interfere with photoreceptor outer segment turnover, leading to an accumulation of vitelliform material.

Acquired vitelliform lesions can occur in association with subretinal drusenoid deposits. Subretinal drusenoid deposits might be mistaken for cuticular drusen because of their similar appearance in color fundus photography but can be easily distinguished with multimodal imaging because they lie above the retinal pigment epithelium. Subretinal drusenoid deposits may reflect abnormalities in the function of the retinal pigment epithelium and their presence may interfere with photoreceptor outer segment turnover, leading to an accumulation of vitelliform material.

From the *LuEsther T. Mertz Retinal Research Center, Manhattan Eye, Ear & Throat Hospital, New York, New York; and †Vitreous Retina Macula Consultants of New York, New York, New York.

Supported in part by The Macula Foundation, Inc.

None of the authors have any financial interests.

Reprint requests: Richard F. Spaide, MD, 460 Park Avenue, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10022; e-mail: rickspaide@yahoo.com

© The Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.