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INTRAVITREAL BEVACIZUMAB INJECTION FOR CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY

LIM, SU JIN MD*; ROH, MI IN MD; KWON, OH WOONG MD, PhD*

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0b013e3181bcf0b4
Original Articles
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Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of intravitreal injection of bevacizumab for treatment of central serous chorioretinopathy.

Methods: In this retrospective case series, six patients (six eyes) with central serous chorioretinopathy were treated with an intravitreal injection of bevacizumab. The outcome measures included visual acuity with Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters, central macular thickness measurement with optical coherence tomography, changes in fluorescein angiography, and indocyanine green angiography.

Results: The mean age of the patients was 42.3 years and the mean follow-up period was 9.0 months (range, 5–12 months). Mean visual acuity ± standard deviation increased from 40.8 ± 8.3 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters at baseline to 49.0 ± 5.0 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters at 1 month (P = 0.046) and to 53.3 ± 5.2 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters at 3 months (P = 0.028). Mean central macular thickness ± standard deviation decreased from 331.5 ± 93.4 μm to 164 ± 34 μm at 3 months (P = 0.043). Leakage on fluorescein angiography and hyperpermeability on indocyanine green angiography decreased in conjunction with improvement in central macular thickness observed by optical coherence tomography.

Conclusion: Intravitreal bevacizumab injections resulted in improved visual acuity and anatomical results for central serous chorioretinopathy.

Bevacizumab resolves central serous chorioretinopathy by reducing choroidal vascular hyperpermeability on indocyanine green angiography. This suggests a possible role of vascular endothelial growth factor in the pathogenesis of central serous chorioretinopathy.

From the *The Retina Center of Nene Eye Hospital, Gangnam-Ku; and †Department of Ophthalmology, The Institute of Vision Research, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

The authors have no proprietary or financial interest in any of the products used in this study.

Reprint requests: Oh Woong Kwon, MD, PhD, Nune Eye Hospital, Noon Building 907-16, Daechi-Dong, Gangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-28, Korea; e-mail: owkwon0301@yuhs.ac.

© The Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.