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ENHANCED DEPTH IMAGING OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CHOROID IN CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY

IMAMURA, YUTAKA MD; FUJIWARA, TAKAMITSU MD; MARGOLIS, RON MD; SPAIDE, RICHARD F. MD

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0b013e3181be0a83
Original Articles
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Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the choroidal thickness in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy, a disease attributed to increased choroidal vascular hyperpermeability.

Methods: Patients with central serous chorioretinopathy underwent enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, which was obtained by positioning a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography device close enough to the eye to acquire an inverted image. Seven sections, each comprising 100 averaged scans, were obtained within a 5° × 30° rectangle to encompass the macula. The subfoveal choroidal thickness was measured from the outer border of the retinal pigment epithelium to the inner scleral border.

Results: The mean age of subjects undergoing enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography was 59.3 years (standard deviation, 15.8 years). Seventeen of 19 patients (89.5%) were men, and 12 (63.2%) patients had bilateral clinical disease. The choroidal thickness measured in 28 eligible eyes of the 19 patients was 505 μm (standard deviation, 124 μm), which was significantly greater than the choroidal thickness in normal eyes (P ≤ 0.001).

Conclusion: Enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography demonstrated a very thick choroid in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy. This finding provides additional evidence that central serous chorioretinopathy may be caused by increased hydrostatic pressure in the choroid.

Enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography demonstrated a very thick choroid in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy, providing additional evidence that central serous chorioretinopathy may be caused by increased hydrostatic pressure in the choroid.

From the Vitreous-Retina-Macula Consultants of New York and the LuEsther T. Mertz Retina Research Center, Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital, New York, New York.

Supported by the LuEsther T. Mertz Retinal Research Center, Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital.

Dr. Imamura was funded by Koureisha Ganshikkan Kenkyu Zaidan, Mishima Saiichi-kinen Gankakenkyu Kokusaikouryu Kikin, and Takeda Kagaku Shinkou Zaidan; Dr. Fujiwarwa by Iwate Medical University; and Dr. Margolis by the Heed Foundation. Dr. Spaide is funded for other studies by Genentech Inc., South San Francisco, CA.

Reprint requests: Richard F. Spaide, MD, Vitreous-Retina-Macula Consultants of New York, 460 Park Avenue, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10022; e-mail: rickspaide@yahoo.com

© The Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.