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SCHALLER U. C. MD; MUELLER, A. J. MD, PhD.; BARTSCH, D.-U. PhD; FREEMAN, W. R. MD; KAMPIK, A. MD, PhD
Retina: June 2000
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Purpose:The authors previously demonstrated that confocal indocyanine green (ICG) angiography is capable of imaging the microcirculation of choroidal melanomas. The purpose of this study is to report their observations regarding the response of the microcirculation using confocal ICG at 1 year after radiation brachytherapy.

Methods:Thirteen patients with unilateral choroidal melanoma were examined once before and several times up to 1 year after radiation brachytherapy (Iodine-125 or Ruthenium-106 plaque). At each visit, a complete ophthalmologic examination including standardized echography and fluorescein and ICG angiography was obtained, the latter using a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope.

Results:In 10 patients (77%), the tumor microcirculation changed considerably within 1 year after treatment. Distortion, thickening, thinning, and complete obliteration of vessels could be observed. In the other 3 patients (23%), no changes in the microcirculation were noticed within the observation period.

Conclusions:Follow-up with confocal ICG of choroidal melanomas after treatment with local radiation brachytherapy allows for visualization of the microcirculation reaction following radiation brachytherapy. This provides the clinician with additional information for the posttreatment monitoring of these patients. Confocal ICG might also be a useful tool to monitor the effects of future antiangiogenesis-based tumor therapies in choroidal melanomas.

From *University Eye Hospital. Ludwigs-Maximilians-University. Munich. Germany; and †Department of Ophthalmology. Shiley Eye Center, University of California. San Diego.

Supported by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Mu 1204/1 -2 (A.J.M.). Whitaker Foundation (D.-U.B.), and Stern Foundation (W.R.F.).

Reprint requests: A.J. Mueller, MD, PhD, University Eye Hospital. Ludwigs-Maximilians-University. Mathildenstraβe 8, 80336 München. Germany.

© The Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.