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ReActivate—A Goal-Orientated Rehabilitation Program for Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors

Smith, Andrew BSc (OT)1; Murnane, Andrew MaApplSci (ExRehab)2,3; Thompson, Kate PhD4,5; Mancuso, Sam MaSW6,7

doi: 10.1097/01.REO.0000000000000158
RESEARCH REPORTS
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Background: Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors tend to have poorer physical and mental health outcomes than their healthy peers or survivors of childhood cancer. This study evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of ReActivate, an 8-week, group-based, goal-orientated rehabilitation program for AYA cancer survivors.

Methods: A prospective, single-site cohort study was conducted of all AYA cancer survivors who self-referred to the ReActivate program. Participants were 21 (60%) males and 14 (40%) females, who ranged in age from 16 to 25 years (M = 21.05, SD = 2.62). Weekly group sessions comprised 1 hour of physical activity, followed by 1 hour of education or self-management sessions. The AYAs completed measures assessing physical functioning (ie, cardiovascular fitness, and muscular endurance and strength), psychosocial outcomes (ie, health-related quality of life), and occupational performance.

Results: The ReActivate program was found to be feasible and acceptable, with an 87% completion rate and a median attendance rate of 7 sessions (range = 3-8). There were statistically significant increases across most of the physical functioning, health-related quality of life, and perceived occupational performance and satisfaction outcomes, with Cohen's d effect sizes ranging from small to large.

Conclusion: The ReActivate program was feasible and acceptable and may have a positive effect on AYA cancer survivors' physical, psychosocial, and occupational functioning. While the findings require replication in a randomized controlled trial, the program has the capacity to optimize delivery of patient care and health resources by bridging the gap that currently exists between the acute and primary care settings.

1ONTrac at Peter Mac Victorian Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Service Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

2ONTrac at Peter Mac Victorian Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Service Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

3Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, Australia

4ONTrac at Peter Mac Victorian Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Service Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

5Department of Social Work, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia

6ONTrac at Peter Mac Victorian Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Service Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

7Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia

Correspondence: Kate Thompson, PhD, ONTrac at Peter Mac, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, 300 Grattan St, Melbourne 3000, VIC, Australia (kate.thompson@petermac.org).

Grant Support: The ONTrac at Peter Mac Victorian Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Service is funded by the Victorian Government. This project was funded by the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre Foundation.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citation appears in the printed text and is provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.rehabonc.com).

Copyright 2019 © Academy of Oncology Physical Therapy, APTA
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