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The Effects of Wheel Running on Skeletal Muscle Function During and Following Doxorubicin Treatment

Hochberg, Leanne M. MS1; Busekrus, Raquel B. MS1; Hydock, David S. PhD2,3

doi: 10.1097/01.REO.0000000000000146
RESEARCH REPORTS
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Doxorubicin (DOX) is a powerful chemotherapeutic agent, but its use is associated with adverse side effects including skeletal muscle dysfunction. Exercise prior to DOX treatment has been shown to attenuate muscle dysfunction, but the effects of exercise on DOX myotoxicity during and following treatment remain unknown.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was therefore to explore the effects of endurance exercise during and following DOX treatment on skeletal muscle function.

Methods: Male rats received DOX or saline weekly for 6 weeks and were housed in either voluntary running wheel cages or sedentary condition. Grip force was measured at baseline, week 5, and week 10, and ex vivo skeletal muscle function was assessed at week 10.

Results: Wheel running during and following DOX treatment attenuated late-onset grip force reduction and promoted improved function in type I, or slow muscle.

Conclusion: Skeletal muscle function can be preserved during and following DOX treatment with low-volume endurance exercise, but this protection may be limited to type I muscle.

1Graduate Student, School of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO

2Associate Professor, School of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO

3University of Northern Colorado Cancer Rehabilitation Institute, Greeley, CO

Correspondence: David S. Hydock, PhD, School of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Northern Colorado, Gunter 2590, Box 39, 501 20th St, Greeley, CO 80639 (david.hydock@unco.edu).

Grant Support: This project was supported by a New Project Proposal Grant from the University of Northern Colorado Faculty Research and Publications Board awarded to D.S.H.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright 2019 © Academy of Oncology Physical Therapy, APTA
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