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Motion Analysis of a Jumping Task in Childhood Leukemia Survivors

Marchese, Victoria, PT, PhD1; Sanders, Ozell, MS2; York, Teresa, MD3; Creath, Robert, PhD4; Rogers, Mark, PT, PhD, FAPTA5

doi: 10.1097/01.REO.0000000000000043
RESEARCH REPORTS
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Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia childhood cancer survivors (ALL CCS) are at risk for long-term musculoskeletal and neuromuscular deficits in balance, motor proficiency, mobility, and peripheral neuropathy. However, studies have not rigorously quantified kinematic and kinetic differences between children developing typically and ALL CCS, as well as its effect on functional movement.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine kinematic and kinetic characteristics of ALL CCS and children developing typically while performing a functional movement, jump.

Methods: The study population comprised 5 ALL CCS (aged 6-17 years) from the Department of Hematology/Oncology-Pediatrics at the University of Maryland Medical System and 5 age- and gender-matched controls. Mobility was assessed through the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and functional movement performance was evaluated during a vertical jump task. Balance was evaluated using Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, Second Edition (BOT-2). Biomechanical measures included ankle, knee, and hip kinematics of the lower extremity and vertical ground reaction forces (VGRF) during impact from a vertical jump.

Results: Significant differences were identified in the modulation of VGRF, and passive ankle range of motion between ALL CCS and children developing typically. Significant relationships between BOT-2 balance subtest score, TUG time, and the modulation of VGRF were also observed.

Conclusions: We recommend physical therapists provide interventions focused on improving balance and mobility in ALL CCS. Future studies with a larger sample size should explore a wide variety of functional movement tasks in ALL CCS.

1Associate Professor, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

2Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

3Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

4Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

5Professor, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

Correspondence: Victoria Marchese, PT, PhD, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (VMarchese@som.umaryland.edu).

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

©2017 (C) Academy of Oncologic Physical Therapy, APTA
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