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Your Smartphone as a Digital Security Blanket

Video Author: John Hunter
Published on: 04.17.2018

Why do people retreat to their smartphones so often, particularly when they are feeling excluded in social situations? John Hunter and colleagues conducted an experiment to test whether the presence and/or use of a smartphone can alter a person’s psychological and physiologic responses to social stress. In this video, John Hunter describes the study and its findings, which provide preliminary evidence regarding the potential stress-buffering effects of smartphone access.

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Creator: John Hunter
Duration: 4:16
Why do people retreat to their smartphones so often, particularly when they are feeling excluded in social situations? John Hunter and colleagues conducted an experiment to test whether the presence and/or use of a smartphone can alter a person’s psychological and physiologic responses to social stress. In this video, John Hunter describes the study and its findings, which provide preliminary evidence regarding the potential stress-buffering effects of smartphone access.
Creator: Martin Picard
Duration: 3:54
The integration of biological, psychological, and social factors in medicine has benefited from increasingly precise stress response biomarkers. Mitochondria, a subcellular organelle with its own genome, produce the energy required for life and generate signals that enable stress adaptation. An emerging concept proposes that mitochondria sense, integrate, and transduce psychosocial and behavioral factors into cellular and molecular modifications. Mitochondrial signaling might in turn contribute to the biological embedding of psychological states.



Creator: John Hunter
Duration: 4:16
Why do people retreat to their smartphones so often, particularly when they are feeling excluded in social situations? John Hunter and colleagues conducted an experiment to test whether the presence and/or use of a smartphone can alter a person’s psychological and physiologic responses to social stress. In this video, John Hunter describes the study and its findings, which provide preliminary evidence regarding the potential stress-buffering effects of smartphone access.
Creator: Martin Picard
Duration: 3:54
The integration of biological, psychological, and social factors in medicine has benefited from increasingly precise stress response biomarkers. Mitochondria, a subcellular organelle with its own genome, produce the energy required for life and generate signals that enable stress adaptation. An emerging concept proposes that mitochondria sense, integrate, and transduce psychosocial and behavioral factors into cellular and molecular modifications. Mitochondrial signaling might in turn contribute to the biological embedding of psychological states.