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No Effect of Adjunctive Minocycline Treatment on Body Metabolism in Patients With Schizophrenia

Liu, Fang, MD, PhD*; Xie, Liqin, MD*; Zhang, Bingkui, MD*; Ruan, Ye, MD; Zeng, Yong, MD, PhD*; Xu, XiuFeng, MD*; Zhao, Jingping, MD, PhD; Fan, Xiaoduo, MD, MPH, MS§

Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology: April 2018 - Volume 38 - Issue 2 - p 125–128
doi: 10.1097/JCP.0000000000000841
Original Contributions

Purpose/Background This study examined the effect of adjunctive minocycline on body metabolism in risperidone-treated patients with schizophrenia.

Methods/Procedures Each subject had a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition diagnosis of schizophrenia and had been on stable dose of risperidone for at least 4 weeks. In a 16-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, subjects received either minocycline (200 mg/d) or placebo. Various metabolic parameters, including weight, waist circumference, fasting insulin, glucose, and lipids, were measured at baseline and week 16.

Findings/Results A total of 63 subjects with schizophrenia were enrolled in the study. Fifty-five patients completed week-16 assessments (27 in the minocycline group, 28 in the placebo group). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in week 16 changes for body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, fasting insulin, glucose, and lipids (P’s > 0.300).

Implications/Conclusions In the present study, adjunctive treatment of minocycline did not seem to improve body metabolism in patients with schizophrenia receiving risperidone. The implications for future studies were discussed.

From the *Department of Psychiatry, First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University; †Mental Health Center of Yunnan Province, Kunming; ‡Mental Health Institute of the Second Xiangya Hospital, Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Hunan Province, Central South University, Changsha, China; and §Psychotic Disorders Program, University of Massachusetts Medical School/UMass Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, MA.

Received May 16, 2017; accepted after revision November 30, 2017.

Reprints: Xiaoduo Fan, MD, MPH, MS, University of Massachusetts Medical School/UMass Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, MA 01605 (e-mail: xiaoduo.fan@umassmed.edu); Jingping Zhao, MD, PhD, Mental Health Institute of the Second Xiangya Hospital, Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Hunan Province, Central South University, Changsha, China (e-mail: zhaojingpingcsu@163.com).

The Clinical trials.gov identifier: NCT01493622

This study was supported by 2014NS147, Research Fund from Yunnan Province, China.

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