Secondary Logo

Share this article on:

Use of the Distal Facial Artery (Angular Artery) for Supermicrosurgical Midface Reconstruction

Yoshimatsu, Hidehiko, MD*; Harima, Mitsunobu, MD; Iida, Takuya, MD; Narushima, Mitsunaga, MD; Karakawa, Ryo, MD; Nakatsukasa, Shuichi, MD; Yamamoto, Takumi, MD; Hayashi, Akitatsu, MD

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery – Global Open: February 5, 2019 - Volume Latest Articles - Issue - p
doi: 10.1097/GOX.0000000000001978
Latest Articles: PDF Only

Background: In free-flap reconstruction of the midface, options for the recipient artery are quite limited; the superficial temporal artery and the facial artery are the most commonly used arteries. We report our approach for the use of the angular artery (the terminal branch of the facial artery) as the recipient artery in free-flap reconstruction of the midface.

Methods: Nine patients with midface defects underwent free-flap reconstructions using the angular artery as the recipient artery. Identification and marking of the facial artery were performed preoperatively using handheld Doppler ultrasound. The angular artery was located through an incision made on the side of the nose. When present, a vena comitans of the facial artery or any subcutaneous vein in the vicinity of the defect was used as the recipient vein. In other cases, the facial vein in the submandibular region was chosen as the recipient vein, using a vein graft.

Results: The average diameter of the angular artery was 0.9 mm (range, 0.7–1.0 mm). In all cases, arterial anastomosis was performed in an end-to-end fashion, and flaps survived completely. In 4 cases, a vein graft was used to bridge the pedicle vein and the facial vein.

Conclusions: Although supermicrosurgical skills may be required for its anastomosis, the angular artery is an anatomically consistent artery, which is suitable for use as the recipient artery in free-flap reconstruction of the midface. Use of the angular artery as the recipient artery allows shorter flap pedicles and decreases the number of vein grafts necessary.

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

From the *Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Published online 5 February 2019.

Received for publication March 7, 2018; accepted August 22, 2018.

Disclosure: The authors have no financial interest to declare in relation to the content of this article. The Article Processing Charge was paid for by the authors.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Clickable URL citations appear in the text.

Hidehiko Yoshimatsu and Mitsunobu Harima contributed equally to this work.

Ethics: This report was published with the consent and permission of the patients involved.

Hidehiko Yoshimatsu, MD, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo, 135–8550 Japan, E-mail: hidehiko.yoshimatsu@gmail.com

Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. All rights reserved.