Secondary Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

What Do Individuals With Borderline Personality Disorder Want From Treatment? A Study of Self-generated Treatment and Recovery Goals

NG, FIONA Y.Y., BHltSci(Hons); CARTER, PHOEBE E., DPsyc; BOURKE, MARIANNE E., PhD; GRENYER, BRIN F.S., PhD

Journal of Psychiatric Practice®: March 2019 - Volume 25 - Issue 2 - p 148–155
doi: 10.1097/PRA.0000000000000369
PRACTITIONER’S CORNER
Buy

Outcome measurement has progressed in the field of personality disorders. While the majority of trials have evaluated outcomes on the basis of symptom and diagnostic indices, what is considered a meaningful and valued outcome to individuals has seldom been investigated. Self-generated treatment goals were collected from 102 individuals seeking treatment for borderline personality disorder and independently coded by 2 raters. Responses were content-analyzed to determine the categories of goals people want for treatment. A total of 464 individual goal units across 4 main goal types emerged in the content analysis: reducing symptoms, improved well-being, better interpersonal relationships, and having a greater sense of self. Although the reduction of symptoms was the most commonly reported goal, 88.2% reported wanting better psychosocial functioning, including improvements in relationships, vocation, and self-understanding. The existence of the wide range of goals suggests that there is a need for clinicians to establish a collaborative formulation of treatment goals with individuals to ensure that treatment is personalized and meaningful.

NG, CARTER, BOURKE, and GRENYER: School of Psychology and Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia

This research was conducted with the support of the Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship awarded to F.Y.Y.N., and NSW Ministry of Health support to the Project Air Strategy for Personality Disorders.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Please send correspondence to: Brin F.S. Grenyer, PhD, School of Psychology, University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2522, Australia (e-mail: grenyer@uow.edu.au).

Copyright © 2019 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.