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Sensory Hypersensitivity Predicts Reduced Sleeping Quality in Patients With Major Affective Disorders

ENGEL-YEGER, BATYA, PhD; GONDA, XENIA, MA, PharmD, PhD; WALKER, MUFFY, MD, PhD; RIHMER, ZOLTAN, MD, PhD; POMPILI, MAURIZIO, MD, PhD; AMORE, MARIO, MD; SERAFINI, GIANLUCA, MD, PhD

Journal of Psychiatric Practice®: January 2017 - Volume 23 - Issue 1 - p 11–24
doi: 10.1097/PRA.0000000000000210
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The goal of this study was to examine the sensory profile (expressed as hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity) of patients with major affective disorders and its relative contribution to the prediction of sleep quality while considering affective temperaments and depression, which may impact sleep quality. We recruited 176 participants (mean age, 47.3 y), of whom 56.8% had a diagnosis of unipolar major depressive disorder and 43.2% a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Reduced sleep quality was evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Affective temperaments were assessed using the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego. Sensory hypersensitivity, assessed using the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile, significantly distinguished between poor and good sleepers. Sleep quality was mainly predicted by the Beck Depression Inventory-II total score and anxious temperament. Sensory hypersensitivity contributed to this prediction mainly with regard to sleep efficiency and related daytime dysfunction.

ENGEL-YEGER: Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel

GONDA: Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Kutvolgyi Clinical Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary; MTA-SE Neuropsychopharmacology Research Group, Hungarian Academy of Sciences and Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary; and Department of Pharmacodynamics, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary

WALKER: International Bipolar Foundation, San Diego, CA

RIHMER: Department of Clinical and Theoretical Mental Health, Kutvolgyi Clinical Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary

POMPILI: Department of Neurosciences, Suicide Prevention Center, Sant’Andrea Hospital, University of Rome, Rome, Italy

AMORE and SERAFINI: Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health, Section of Psychiatry, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy

X.G. is recipient of the Janos Bolyai Research Fellowship of the Hungarian Academy of Science.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Please send correspondence to: Gianluca Serafini, MD, PhD, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health (DINOGMI), Section of Psychiatry, University of Genoa, IRCCS San Martino, Largo Rosanna Benzi 10, Genoa 16132, Italy (e-mail: gianluca.serafini@unige.it).

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