Meaning of fabric orthoses to long-term users with multiple sclerosis: An interpretative phenomenological analysis : Prosthetics and Orthotics International

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Qualitative Research Report

Meaning of fabric orthoses to long-term users with multiple sclerosis: An interpretative phenomenological analysis

Snowdon, Nicola1; Booth, Susan2; McLean, Sionnadh1; Wheat, Jon3; Piercy, Hilary4

Author Information
Prosthetics and Orthotics International 45(3):p 246-253, June 2021. | DOI: 10.1097/PXR.0000000000000006

Abstract

Background: 

Fabric orthoses are elasticated garments designed to provide support to the musculoskeletal system. They may benefit people with multiple sclerosis; however, in this population, their acceptability is largely unexplored.

Objectives: 

This study aimed to explore the meaning that fabric orthoses hold for people with multiple sclerosis and factors influencing acceptability.

Study Design: 

This is a qualitative study using an interpretative phenomenological analysis to explore the meaning ascribed to lived experience.

Methods: 

Four people with multiple sclerosis participated in face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Two used upper limb orthotic sleeves for involuntary movement control, one used orthotic shorts, and one used a soft ankle brace. Three participants had fabric orthoses they no longer used. Themes were validated by peer review.

Findings: 

Two themes were identified. “Giving back control” describes how perceived physical benefits, such as decreased involuntary movement and improved stability, led to important benefits in autonomy and self-image. Orthoses were not worn longer-term where self-image was not improved. “Learning to live with an orthosis” captures the way in which participants learnt from experience over months or years how to maximize effectiveness and overcome disadvantages. Acceptability was determined specific to the contexts in which the orthoses were used, with the social appropriateness of appearance and the demands of tasks being important considerations.

Conclusions: 

Fabric orthoses can be acceptable to people with multiple sclerosis. Professionals should be mindful of the active learning process that users engage in as they learn about the pros and cons of orthotic use. Further research into effectiveness is needed.

Erratum

Meaning of fabric orthoses to long-term users with multiple sclerosis: An interpretative phenomenological analysis: Erratum

In the article mentioned above,1 Susan Booth and Jon Wheat’s affiliations are incorrect. The correct author affiliations are shown below:

Susan Booth should be affiliated to the “School of Sport and Biological Sciences, University of Bolton, United Kingdom.”

Jon Wheat should be affiliated to “Academy of Sport and Physical Activity, College of Health, Wellbeing and Life Sciences, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, United Kingdom.”

Prosthetics and Orthotics International. 46(1):90, February 2022.

Copyright © 2021 International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics

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