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Why Videos Matter So Much in Plastic Surgery Today: A Complete Index of Videos in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open

Boehm, Kaitlin S. M.D.; Rohrich, Rod J. M.D.; Lalonde, Donald H. M.D.

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: April 2018 - Volume 141 - Issue 4 - p 1051-1054
doi: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000004257
Plastic Surgery Focus: Special Topics
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Summary: The main purpose of this article is to provide the reader with an easily searchable online index of the first 1976 videos published in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open to facilitate access to readers. The authors also describe the history and evolution of video articles in the first journal to provide a large offline video library of plastic surgery. The importance of videos in plastic surgery education is explored.

Saint John, New Brunswick; Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; and Dallas, Texas

From the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Dalhousie University; and the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

Received for publication June 28, 2017; accepted October 25, 2017.

Disclosure:Dr. Rohrich receives instrument royalties from Eriem Surgical, Inc., and book royalties from Thieme Medical Publishing. No funding was received for this article. The other authors have no disclosures.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. A direct URL citation appears in the text; simply type the URL address into any Web browser to access this content. A clickable link to the material is provided in the HTML text of this article on the Journal’s website (www.PRSJournal.com).

Donald H. Lalonde, M.D., Suite C204, 600 Main Street, Saint John, New Brunswick E2K 1J5, Canada, drdonlalonde@nb.aibn.com

Watching a surgical video crystallizes the learning and comprehension of a new technique as it brings it to life for the viewing surgeon. It provides a far superior live perspective than reading a description or seeing a still image in a journal article. Modern surgical journals and textbooks take advantage of the digital evolution by incorporating videos into the text.

This article provides an easily searchable index to all videos published in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open extending from 2003 to the day you download it. The index is updated every month. You can also access the current index in the PRS and PRS Global Open web sites. (See Document, Supplemental Digital Content 1, which shows the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open Video Index, which provides an easily searchable index to find all videos ever published in the two journals, available at http://links.lww.com/PRS/C383.) The 1976 videos published in that period (Table 1) may be the most of any peer-reviewed surgical journal in the world. The Cosmetic section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery leads the other sections with the largest number of videos (Table 2). The very first video in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery was published is in the October of 2003 on alloplastic chin augmentation.1

Table 1.

Table 1.

Table 2.

Table 2.

Menick published the first CME with videos in 2010 with a classic article on nasal reconstruction with forehead flaps.2 Since then, almost every CME article enriches its content with videos of masters performing surgery in real time (Table 3). To locate these videos, search for “Yes” in the “CME” column of the Video Index.

Table 3.

Table 3.

Use of videos has flourished with the onset of the training and evolution of millennials into plastic surgery over the past 10 years. Young plastic surgeons using new devices such as the iPad have lifted video publication and viewing dramatically.

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THE IMPORTANCE OF VIDEO IN PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY

Bringing video into Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open generated the birth of the video article. These short articles dedicated to mostly video learning have been a major step in surgical education. Much like the entire Video Index, the Video Plus articles are diverse in the content they cover. Instructional videos covering broad topics ranging from otoplasty3 to others specifying the fine details of dissecting the internal mammary vasculature4 are available to the plastic surgery learner.

The Journal has always been at the forefront of cosmetic and reconstructive surgery, and especially in video publication. In 2010, Wolters Kluwer enabled Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery to become the first journal to empower viewers to watch surgical videos on the iPad. This advance drastically changed how plastic surgery techniques are learned by allowing readers to learn from video even when not connected to the Internet. Surgeons can take advantage of long plane trips or weekends in the country to further their continuing surgical education with video they can download onto their device and watch in real time.

Narration enhances the value of videos tremendously by permitting the reader to hear the surgeon’s thought process. Many of the videos are produced in non–English-speaking countries from which authors are challenged to write and speak in their nonnative tongue. In spite of this hurdle, most of the videos are narrated in English, with a few exceptions. As of 2017, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery requires that all video content longer than 30 seconds be narrated in English or have English subtitles to clarify what the surgeon is observing and thinking.

The Video Index (see Document, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/PRS/C383) is rich with content. The Stuzin/Baker Gordon Symposium on Cosmetic Surgery is an example that provides classic lectures and live surgery videos by most of the great aesthetic surgery masters. Nine of the 10 most watched videos on Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery originate from the Baker Gordon Symposium on Cosmetic Surgery (Table 4). Any good student of cosmetic surgery can improve by investing time to watch the cosmetic experts operate or speak there. A recent example is by Dr. Simon Wall demonstrating his S.A.F.E. circumferential lipoabdominoplasty.5

Table 4.

Table 4.

Many videos cover subjects outside of pure surgical technique. There are classic videos such as how to inject local anesthesia so it does not hurt,6 which can be helpful to all doctors. Many address preoperative markings such as those by Dr. Elizabeth Hall-Findlay,7 or the basics of mapping propeller flaps by Dr. Michel Saint-Cyr.8 Postoperative video results of facial palsy operations are much more revealing than still images.9

Videos are ideal for resident education, as they do not require a long time commitment. Most are less than 5 minutes in duration. In addition, watching and listening requires less concentration than reading. Video enables the fatigued resident to passively absorb valuable education from master surgeons at the end of a long day of work.

Surgical video integration into articles and articles will continue to evolve and improve in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. The goal is to provide the reader/viewer with the future of plastic surgery learning in whatever venue he or she desires. We all learn better and faster if we read it, see it “live,” and then do it in the comfort of our own environment. Cutting the leading edge of educational innovation is the key to the future of plastic surgery innovation, safety, and competence.

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HOW TO SEARCH FOR ANY VIDEO EVER PUBLISHED IN THE TWO JOURNALS

Finding any video ever published in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open is simple: use the search function to look up authors, key words, title, and section titles from our first 14 years of video publication (see Document, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/PRS/C383). For example, to find a video on eyelid reconstruction by Mark Codner,10 simply enter “Codner” into the search bar in Excel (Fig. 1). Click the “forward” arrow until you find a video that satisfies your search (Fig. 2). Terms can be searched for by key words (e.g., “breast reconstruction,” “free flap,” “face lift,” “rhinoplasty,” “flexor tendon,” “cleft lip”) and by section title (e.g., “Cosmetic,” “Breast,” “Experimental”). To maximize search results, searches can be performed both by the technical name and by the “lay” name (e.g., “blepharoplasty” and “eye lift”). For a specific flap, searches can be performed for both the abbreviated name and the full name (e.g., “ALT flap” and “anterolateral thigh flap”). The videos are presented in reverse chronologic order starting from the most recent. Most videos in the database play automatically online. However, some will download onto your computer before they can be played. Many of the early videos are a.wmv file. VLC media player is an example of a program that does support.wmv and other video formats that may appear for early videos. It can be downloaded from the Internet onto your computer.11

Fig. 1.

Fig. 1.

Fig. 2.

Fig. 2.

We hope that the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open Video Index will empower and facilitate plastic surgeons and trainees to further their plastic surgery knowledge and technical skills. The Video Index will be updated regularly to include all videos published in the future. Readers of the two journals will be able to find the Video Index on the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Web site under the “Digital Media” titled “Video Archive Navigator.”

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REFERENCES

1. Yaremchuk MJImproving aesthetic outcomes after alloplastic chin augmentation. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2003;112:14221432; discussion 14331434.
2. Menick FJNasal reconstruction. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2010;125:138e150e.
3. Thorne CHOtoplasty. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2008;122:291292.
4. Antony AK, Kamdar M, Da Lio A, Mehrara BJTechnique of internal mammary dissection using pectoralis major flap to prevent contour deformities. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2009;123:16741675.
5. Baker Gordon Symposium on Cosmetic Surgery. S.A.F.E. circumferential liposuction with abdominoplasty: Part 1. An interactive video by Simeon H. Wall, Jr. MD from the 50th Annual Baker Gordon Symposium on Cosmetic Surgery. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2017;139.
6. Strazar AR, Leynes PG, Lalonde DHMinimizing the pain of local anesthesia injection. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2013;132:675684.
7. Nahabedian MYBreast deformities and mastopexy. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2011;127:91e102e.
8. Mohan AT, Sur YJ, Zhu L, et al.The concepts of propeller, perforator, keystone, and other local flaps and their role in the evolution of reconstruction. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2016;138:710e729e.
9. Garcia RM, Hadlock TA, Klebuc MJ, Simpson RL, Zenn MR, Marcus JRContemporary solutions for the treatment of facial nerve paralysis. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2015;135:1025e1046e.
10. Alghoul M, Pacella SJ, McClellan WT, Codner MAEyelid reconstruction. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2013;132:288e302e.
11. VidoLAN Organization. VLC media player. Available at: http://www.videolan.org/vlc/index.html. Accessed June 19, 2017.

Supplemental Digital Content

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Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons