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Sequelae of Facial Palsy: A Comprehensive Treatment

Guerreschi, Pierre M.D., Ph.D.; Labbé, Daniel M.D.

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: October 2019 - Volume 144 - Issue 4 - p 682e-692e
doi: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000006079
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Learning Objectives: After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Identify the different types of facial paralysis sequelae and define the several medical and surgical techniques commonly available today. 2. Develop a surgical plan to restore symmetry of the face at rest and in dynamic expressions and manage the patient during smile rehabilitation after dynamic smile reanimation with regional or free muscle transfer. 3. Understand the different types of facial paralysis sequelae and know the several medical and surgical techniques commonly available today. 4. Establish a comprehensive treatment plan to restore symmetry of the face at rest and in dynamic expressions and support the patient during smile rehabilitation after dynamic smile reanimation with regional or free muscle transfer.

Summary: Sequelae of facial palsy have a negative impact on the cosmetic aspect and functions of the face. They bear severe consequences for patients with regard to their body image and social relationships. There are numerous medical and surgical treatments that should be proposed to patients to achieve comprehensive facial symmetry. The key to an adapted therapeutic choice, to achieve the best outcomes for patients, is to perform a comprehensive evaluation of the paralyzed face and have broad knowledge of the several techniques described over time in the literature. The patient should be informed of the different therapeutic alternatives, their implications, and their limits. With this article, readers will be able to accurately diagnose the different types of facial paralysis sequelae to develop a surgical plan adapted to each case to restore symmetry at rest and in motion.

Lille and Caen, France

From the Plastic Surgery Department, University Hospital of Lille; the Competence Center for Clefts and CranioFacial Malformations; and the Plastic Surgery Department, Centre Hospitalier Privé Saint Martin.

Received for publication July 18, 2018; accepted May 28, 2019.

Disclosure:The authors have no financial interest to declare in relation to the content of this article.

Related digital media are available in the full-text version of the article on www.PRSJournal.com.

Pierre Guerreschi, M.D., Ph.D., Plastic Surgery Department, University Hospital of Lille, Competence Center for Clefts and CranioFacial Malformations, 2, Rue Emile Laine, F-59000 Lille, France, pierguerreschi@gmail.com

Copyright © 2019 by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons