Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate Use during Pregnancy and Infant Bone Health

the Tenofovir in Pregnancy Pilot Study

Kourtis, Athena P., MD, PhD, MPH*; Wiener, Jeffrey, PhD*; Wang, Liming, MD; Fan, Bo, PhD; Shepherd, John A., PhD; Chen, Lili, MD§; Liu, Wei, MD; Shepard, Colin, MD; Wang, Linhong, MD; Wang, Ailin, MD; Bulterys, Marc, MD, PhD

The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal: November 2018 - Volume 37 - Issue 11 - p e264–e268
doi: 10.1097/INF.0000000000002152
HIV Reports
Buy

The effects of maternal tenofovir use on infant bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) were evaluated in a pilot study of HIV/Hepatitis B-coinfected pregnant women in China. BMD and BMC were assessed at age 6 months of life in 14 tenofovir-exposed and 13 unexposed infants. Trends toward lower BMC and BMD were observed in infants exposed to maternal tenofovir but were not statistically significant.

From the *Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA

Global AIDS Program – China Office, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Beijing, China

Department of Radiology & Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, CA

§Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region Health and Family Planning Commission, Nanning, China

Guangxi Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Nanning, China

National Center for Women and Children’s Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.

Accepted for publication May 12, 2018.

Supported by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangxi Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, and Gilead Sciences, Inc, through a grant to the CDC Foundation.

The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

A.P.K. contributed to study design and inception, data interpretation, literature search, wrote the manuscript, and agrees to be accountable for all aspects of the work. J.W. contributed to study design; analysis and interpretation of data; critical drafting and revision of the report for important intellectual content; final approval of the manuscript; and agrees to be accountable for all aspects of the work. L.W. contributed to the literature search, study design, data interpretation, writing of the report, final approval of the manuscript, and agrees to be accountable for all aspects of the work. B.F. and J.A.S. contributed to acquisition and analysis of the DXA scan data, and contributed to data interpretation and revision of the manuscript. L.C. contributed to study inception, participant enrollment, data acquisition and interpretation, editing of the report, and final approval of the manuscript. W.L. contributed to data acquisition and interpretation, editing of the report, and final approval of the manuscript. C.S. contributed to data acquisition and interpretation, editing of the report, and final approval of the manuscript. L.W. contributed to study design, protocol development, site implementation monitoring, and critical review of the manuscript. A.W. contributed to data acquisition, laboratory practices and quality control, analysis and interpretation, revision of the report, and final approval of the manuscript. M.B. contributed to study design, data interpretation, critical writing and revision of the report, and final approval of the manuscript.

Address for correspondence: Athena P. Kourtis, MD, PhD, MPH, Division of Reproductive Health, NCCDPHP, CDC, F74, 4770 Buford Highway, NE, Atlanta GA 30341. E-mail: apk3@cdc.gov.

Copyright © 2018 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.