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Measles and Rubella Seroprevalence Among HIV–infected and Uninfected Zambian Youth

Sutcliffe, Catherine G. PhD, ScM; Searle, Kelly PhD, ScM; Matakala, Hellen K. Dip Biomed; Greenman, Michelle P. BA; Rainwater-Lovett, Kaitlin PhD, MPH; Thuma, Philip E. MD; Moss, William J. MD, MPH

The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal: March 2017 - Volume 36 - Issue 3 - p 301–306
doi: 10.1097/INF.0000000000001422
HIV Reports
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Background: Measles and congenital rubella syndrome remain significant causes of morbidity and mortality despite available vaccines. HIV-infected youth may be at increased risk of measles because of greater waning immunity after vaccination. At a population level, they constitute a potentially large pool of susceptibles to measles and rubella. More data among HIV-infected youth in sub-Saharan Africa are needed to guide vaccination policy and control strategies.

Methods: This cross-sectional study was nested within 2 ongoing studies of malaria and HIV in Zambia. Dried blood spot cards from youth (5–15 years) in these studies from 2009 to 2013 were tested for IgG antibodies to measles and rubella viruses. HIV-uninfected youth, HIV-infected treatment-naive youth and HIV-infected youth receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) were compared.

Results: A total of 617 HIV-uninfected, 144 HIV-infected treatment-naive and 128 HIV-infected youth receiving ART were included in this study. The proportion seropositive for measles virus was significantly higher among HIV-uninfected youth (92.5%) compared with HIV-infected treatment-naive youth (74.1%) and HIV-infected youth receiving ART (71.9%). No differences by age were observed. The proportion seropositive for rubella virus was significantly higher among HIV-uninfected youth (54.7%) compared with HIV-infected treatment-naive youth (41.7%) and HIV-infected youth receiving ART (49.6%), with increases observed by age for all groups.

Conclusions: Measles seroprevalence was lower among HIV-infected than uninfected youth, consistent with waning immunity after measles vaccination. HIV-infected youth would benefit from revaccination. Half of all youth in rural Zambia were susceptible to rubella and may need targeting for catch-up rubella campaigns when measlesrubella vaccine is introduced.

Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text.

From the *Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; Macha Research Trust, Macha Hospital, Choma, Zambia; and Department of Pediatrics-Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

Accepted for publication May 20, 2016.

The findings and conclusions included in this content are solely the responsibility of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

This work was made possible by a grant from the Center for Global Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The parent study on HIV was supported by the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) through Cooperative Agreement 5U2GPS001930-05 from the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Global AIDS Program. The parent study on malaria is supported by the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health as part of the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (U19 AI089680). The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal’s website (www.pidj.com).

Address for correspondence: Catherine Sutcliffe, PhD, ScM, Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD. E-mail: csutcli1@jhu.edu.

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