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Cerebral Palsy Research: How to Improve Physical Therapy Quality


Published on: 07.16.2019
Associated with: Pediatric Physical Therapy. 31(3):234-241, July 2019

CINCINNATI, Ohio—“Documenting Physical Therapy Dose for Individuals With Cerebral Palsy: A Quality Improvement Initiative” A systematic analysis of real world data from physical therapy treatment (published in the latest edition of Pediatric Physical Therapy journal) has validated a "Flow Sheet" that improves both record-keeping and therapy quality for patients with cerebral palsy. Lead author Amy F. Bailes PT PhD PCS, from the Division of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio discusses her group's study findings and clinical recommendations.

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Duration: 11:02
CINCINNATI, Ohio—“Documenting Physical Therapy Dose for Individuals With Cerebral Palsy: A Quality Improvement Initiative” A systematic analysis of real world data from physical therapy treatment (published in the latest edition of Pediatric Physical Therapy journal) has validated a "Flow Sheet" that improves both record-keeping and therapy quality for patients with cerebral palsy. Lead author Amy F. Bailes PT PhD PCS, from the Division of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio discusses her group's study findings and clinical recommendations.
Creator:
Duration: 9:35
OMAHA, NEBRASKA—Children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy achieved improved functioning of the prefrontal cortex regions of their brains in a study using intense exercise sessions—designed as games—in which both hands had to be used together to achieve specific manual dexterity tasks.

In the investigation—published in Pediatric Physical Therapy journal (Pediatr Phys Ther 2018;0:1–8)—lead author Swati Surkar PT, PhD from the Sensorimotor Learning Laboratory, at the Munroe-Meyer Institute in the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, described her group's findings from the trial in a cohort of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy who had only one arm functioning normally and needed to get their impaired limbs to perform motor tasks more effectively.

The researchers tracked brain functioning before and after therapy by using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to detect cerebral cortical oxygenation.

They concluded that not only did the bimanual therapy (known as Hand Arm Bimanual Intensive Therapy—HABIT) help children achieve significant improvements in affected limb function but children also had a clear increase of the brain's ability to plan strategies to achieve the skill tasks required by the HABIT protocol.

Senior study author Max Kurz PhD, Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at the Munroe-Meyer Institute in the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, commented that the findings had potential implications far beyond treatment for cerebral palsy and give confirmation that intensive physical exercise brings direct benefit to the brain.
Creator:
Duration: 5:42
Author Eydie Kendall PT, PhD, PCS Assistant Professor at Plymouth State University’s Doctor of Physical Therapy Program talks about findings from her investigation of attitudes to childhood obesity among physical therapists in American schools and describes the pivotal position they occupy for providing interventions to combat this looming health threat.

Sanjay Kinra MBBS MD MRCP MSc PhD FFPH, Professor of Clinical Epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and Consultant Paediatrician (Childhood Obesity) at University College London adds comments from the perspective of his global research in pediatric obesity.

Dylan Thompson PhD, Chair of Human Physiology and Research Director at the Department for Health, University of Bath, England, discusses his research findings about the science connecting physical activity with weight control.
Creator:
Duration: 1:22
UTRECHT, Netherlands—Parents could be a big help in detecting motor function deficits early in life by making video clips of their child and sending them to the physical therapist for assessment. A study in Pediatric Physical Therapy journal (Pediatr Phys Ther 2017;00:1–6) found that home videos helped clinicians keep track of their patients’ developmental progress and were a welcome supplement to face-to-face consultations. Marike Boonzaijer PT, MSc, of the Institute for Human Movement Studies, Research Center for Innovation in Healthcare at the University of Applied Sciences in Utrecht, talks about the benefits of adding family films to the clinicians’ armory of therapeutic approaches.
Creator:
Duration: 1:22
NEW YORK CITY—A large study of New York school children with typical development has established baseline data for the “timed up and go” test (“TUG”) in wide use for assessing children’s goals and physical therapy needs. The data are published in Pediatric Physical Therapy journal (Pediatr Phys Ther 2016;00:1–8). Adina Itzkowitz, MS, PT, a New York City Department of Education Supervisor of Physical Therapy, discusses the findings and practical recommendations.
Creator:
Duration: 2:31
NEW YORK—Segmental trunk support was successful for improving posture in children with cerebral palsy—and helping them reach for objects—in research published in Pediatric Physical Therapy journal. Victor Santamaria PT, PhD from Teachers College, Columbia University, New York NY, discusses the clinical implications of his findings with Peter Goodwin. (Pediatr Phys Ther 2016;00:1–9)
Creator:
Duration: 0:21
Sandra Kaplan PT DPT PhD, Vice Chair of Curriculum and Accreditation in the Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Sciences at Rutgers The State University of New Jersey in Newark assesses the value of reading Pediatric Physical Therapy journal for physical therapy clinicians in pediatric practice throughout the world.
Creator:
Duration: 3:14
Survey findings about the effectiveness of a recently-introduced clinical practice guideline for congenital muscular torticollis therapy are reported in Pediatric Physical Therapy journal by Sandra Kaplan PT DPT PhD, Director, Post Professional Education at the Stuart D. Cook MD Guild and the Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Science at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. ("Uptake of the Congenital Muscular Torticollis Clinical Practice Guideline Into Pediatric Practice")Pediatr Phys Ther 2017;00:1–7
Creator:
Duration: 1:37
NEW YORK—A case series of two children with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is reported in Pediatric Physical Therapy journal by Jennifer L. Fay, PT, DPT, NCS, Neurologic Clinical Specialist, Vestibular Rehabiliation at New York University's Langone Medical Center in New York City. Fay demonstrates the successful implementation of the Dix-Hallpike test and therapeutic correction of the condition. (Pediatr Phys Ther 2016;00:1–6)



Creator:
Duration: 11:02
CINCINNATI, Ohio—“Documenting Physical Therapy Dose for Individuals With Cerebral Palsy: A Quality Improvement Initiative” A systematic analysis of real world data from physical therapy treatment (published in the latest edition of Pediatric Physical Therapy journal) has validated a "Flow Sheet" that improves both record-keeping and therapy quality for patients with cerebral palsy. Lead author Amy F. Bailes PT PhD PCS, from the Division of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio discusses her group's study findings and clinical recommendations.
Creator:
Duration: 9:35
OMAHA, NEBRASKA—Children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy achieved improved functioning of the prefrontal cortex regions of their brains in a study using intense exercise sessions—designed as games—in which both hands had to be used together to achieve specific manual dexterity tasks.

In the investigation—published in Pediatric Physical Therapy journal (Pediatr Phys Ther 2018;0:1–8)—lead author Swati Surkar PT, PhD from the Sensorimotor Learning Laboratory, at the Munroe-Meyer Institute in the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, described her group's findings from the trial in a cohort of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy who had only one arm functioning normally and needed to get their impaired limbs to perform motor tasks more effectively.

The researchers tracked brain functioning before and after therapy by using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to detect cerebral cortical oxygenation.

They concluded that not only did the bimanual therapy (known as Hand Arm Bimanual Intensive Therapy—HABIT) help children achieve significant improvements in affected limb function but children also had a clear increase of the brain's ability to plan strategies to achieve the skill tasks required by the HABIT protocol.

Senior study author Max Kurz PhD, Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at the Munroe-Meyer Institute in the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, commented that the findings had potential implications far beyond treatment for cerebral palsy and give confirmation that intensive physical exercise brings direct benefit to the brain.
Creator:
Duration: 5:42
Author Eydie Kendall PT, PhD, PCS Assistant Professor at Plymouth State University’s Doctor of Physical Therapy Program talks about findings from her investigation of attitudes to childhood obesity among physical therapists in American schools and describes the pivotal position they occupy for providing interventions to combat this looming health threat.

Sanjay Kinra MBBS MD MRCP MSc PhD FFPH, Professor of Clinical Epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and Consultant Paediatrician (Childhood Obesity) at University College London adds comments from the perspective of his global research in pediatric obesity.

Dylan Thompson PhD, Chair of Human Physiology and Research Director at the Department for Health, University of Bath, England, discusses his research findings about the science connecting physical activity with weight control.
Creator:
Duration: 1:22
UTRECHT, Netherlands—Parents could be a big help in detecting motor function deficits early in life by making video clips of their child and sending them to the physical therapist for assessment. A study in Pediatric Physical Therapy journal (Pediatr Phys Ther 2017;00:1–6) found that home videos helped clinicians keep track of their patients’ developmental progress and were a welcome supplement to face-to-face consultations. Marike Boonzaijer PT, MSc, of the Institute for Human Movement Studies, Research Center for Innovation in Healthcare at the University of Applied Sciences in Utrecht, talks about the benefits of adding family films to the clinicians’ armory of therapeutic approaches.
Creator:
Duration: 1:22
NEW YORK CITY—A large study of New York school children with typical development has established baseline data for the “timed up and go” test (“TUG”) in wide use for assessing children’s goals and physical therapy needs. The data are published in Pediatric Physical Therapy journal (Pediatr Phys Ther 2016;00:1–8). Adina Itzkowitz, MS, PT, a New York City Department of Education Supervisor of Physical Therapy, discusses the findings and practical recommendations.
Creator:
Duration: 2:31
NEW YORK—Segmental trunk support was successful for improving posture in children with cerebral palsy—and helping them reach for objects—in research published in Pediatric Physical Therapy journal. Victor Santamaria PT, PhD from Teachers College, Columbia University, New York NY, discusses the clinical implications of his findings with Peter Goodwin. (Pediatr Phys Ther 2016;00:1–9)
Creator:
Duration: 0:21
Sandra Kaplan PT DPT PhD, Vice Chair of Curriculum and Accreditation in the Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Sciences at Rutgers The State University of New Jersey in Newark assesses the value of reading Pediatric Physical Therapy journal for physical therapy clinicians in pediatric practice throughout the world.
Creator:
Duration: 3:14
Survey findings about the effectiveness of a recently-introduced clinical practice guideline for congenital muscular torticollis therapy are reported in Pediatric Physical Therapy journal by Sandra Kaplan PT DPT PhD, Director, Post Professional Education at the Stuart D. Cook MD Guild and the Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Science at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. ("Uptake of the Congenital Muscular Torticollis Clinical Practice Guideline Into Pediatric Practice")Pediatr Phys Ther 2017;00:1–7
Creator:
Duration: 1:37
NEW YORK—A case series of two children with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is reported in Pediatric Physical Therapy journal by Jennifer L. Fay, PT, DPT, NCS, Neurologic Clinical Specialist, Vestibular Rehabiliation at New York University's Langone Medical Center in New York City. Fay demonstrates the successful implementation of the Dix-Hallpike test and therapeutic correction of the condition. (Pediatr Phys Ther 2016;00:1–6)