Commentary on “Is Measuring Physical Literacy in School-Aged Children With Cystic Fibrosis or Congenital Heart Disease Needed?” : Pediatric Physical Therapy

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Commentary on “Is Measuring Physical Literacy in School-Aged Children With Cystic Fibrosis or Congenital Heart Disease Needed?”

Clifton, Amanda PT, DPT; Parish, Ashley PT, DPT, CRT

Author Information
Pediatric Physical Therapy 35(1):p 48, January 2023. | DOI: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000986
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“How could I apply this information?”

Noordstar and colleagues provide unique insight into the importance of physical literacy and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in children with cystic fibrosis and congenital heart disease. The research team found a moderate association between CRF and motivation, CRF and confidence, and CRF and self-perceived moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Clinicians can apply these findings to provide a more well-rounded approach to treatment by promoting motivation and confidence instead of focusing solely on motor performance. Cognitive approaches, such as the self-determination theory, may be used in treatment. This growth mindset approach is consistent with cardiovascular and pulmonary rehabilitation programs. Studies may change the mindset of how to best intervene in these populations.

“What should I be mindful about when applying this information?”

The small sample size relative to conditions does not generalize and may have different results if conducted with a larger sample. As discussed by the authors, not all of the measures suggested by the Canadian Assessment of Physical Literacy-Second Edition (CAPL-2) were used and CAPL-2 is also not validated for the study age range. Reported physical activity was not measured objectively with a device such as a fitness tracker. Clinicians should be mindful of these limitations when developing interventions and providing education. Although researchers did not find an association between motor performance and activity or motor performance and CRF, the limitations discussed earlier may have skewed the results. Further studies with rigorous methods are needed to support findings. However, clinicians should consider the addition of physical literacy assessments, as well as promoting motivation and confidence while still aiding in motor performance activities for children with cystic fibrosis and congenital heart disease.

Amanda Clifton, PT, DPT
Board-Certified Clinical Specialist in Cardiovascular and Pulmonary and Pediatric Physical Therapy
Nicklaus Children's Hospital
Miami, Florida
Ashley Parish, PT, DPT, CRT
Board-Certified Clinical Specialist in Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Physical Therapy
UAB, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
Birmingham, Alabama

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