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Informal Dance Intervention Improves BMI and Functional Gait in an Adolescent With Cerebral Palsy

A Case Report

Owens, Meghan PT, DPT; Silkwood-Sherer, Debbie PT, DHSc, HPCS

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000653
CASE REPORTS
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Purpose: This case study examined the effects of incorporating Informal Dance Intervention into traditional therapy sessions on body mass index and functional walking in an adolescent girl with cerebral palsy.

Case Description: A 15-year-old adolescent girl, Gross Motor Function Classification System Level II, participated in Informal Dance Intervention twice weekly in 2, 16 session phases. Sixty-minute sessions focused on waltzing, contra dancing, square dancing, and belly dancing to improve timing, endurance, vestibular functioning, and core strength.

Conclusions: Waist circumference decreased, walking speed increased on the 6-Minute Walk Test and Timed Up and Down Stairs, balance confidence increased per the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, and vestibular functioning improved per changes in the Functional Gait Assessment.

Recommendations for Clinical Practice: Incorporating Informal Dance Intervention, in conjunction with therapy, may be motivating and improve overall health for adolescents with cerebral palsy to combat their tendency of increased sedentary lifestyle.

This case study examined the effects of incorporating informal dance intervention into therapy sessions on body mass index and functional walking in an adolescent girl with cerebral palsy.

CORA Physical Therapy (Dr Owens), Roanoke, Virginia; Doctoral Program in Physical Therapy (Dr Silkwood-Sherer), Central Michigan University, Mt Pleasant, Michigan.

Correspondence: Meghan Owens, PT, DPT, CORA Physical Therapy, 1421 Third St SW, Roanoke, VA 24016 (MFFeih@uwalumni.com).

At the time this article was written, Meghan Owens was obtaining her Doctor of Physical Therapy at School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, The University of Montana, Missoula, Montana.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2019 Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy of the American Physical Therapy Association