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Benefits of Activity-Based Interventions Among Female Adolescents Who Are Overweight and Obese

Bonney, Emmanuel PT, PhD; Ferguson, Gillian PT, PhD; Burgess, Theresa PT, PhD; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien PT, PhD

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000636
RESEARCH REPORTS
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Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 2 activity-based motor interventions among female adolescents who are overweight and obese.

Methods: This study was conducted in a low-income community of Cape Town, South Africa. The study involved 52 participants classified as overweight and obese. Participants were randomly assigned to task-oriented functional training or Wii Fit intervention. Both interventions were 45 minutes of active training once a week for 14 weeks. Outcome measures included aerobic fitness, motor coordination, and self-efficacy. Data were collected before and after the interventions.

Results: Participants in both groups demonstrated significant improvement in aerobic fitness and motor coordination but not self-efficacy. However, no between-group differences were observed on any of the outcomes.

Conclusions: Activity-based interventions may improve aerobic fitness and motor coordination in female adolescents who are overweight and obese and may also help prevent declines in physical fitness and coordination in this population.

The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two activity-based motor interventions among female adolescents who are overweight and obese.

Department of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences (Drs Bonney, Ferguson, Burgess, and Smits-Engelsman), Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; and Department of Physiotherapy (Dr Bonney), School of Biomedical and Allied Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana.

Correspondence: Emmanuel Bonney, PT, PhD, Department of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Barnard Fuller Bldg, Anzio Rd, Observatory Cape Town, 7935, South Africa (ebonney10@gmail.com).

Grant Support: This work received financial support from the USHEPiA fellowship scheme, a doctoral fellowship grant that was awarded to the first author.

At the time this manuscript was written, Emmanuel Bonney was a doctoral candidate at the Department of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2019 Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy of the American Physical Therapy Association