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Physical Therapy for a Child With Encopresis

A Case Report

Anderson, Brittany PT, DPT

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000631
CASE REPORTS
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Purpose: To describe the implementation and effectiveness of a multimodal therapeutic approach used to successfully treat a child with encopresis.

Summary of Key Points: The child demonstrated chronic constipation, poor pelvic floor muscle awareness, weakness, and incoordination during voiding. He participated in 8 sessions of physical therapy intervention including pelvic floor muscle awareness, strengthening and coordination exercises, behavioral adaptations, diet modification, and use of media, art, and interactive visualization activities.

Conclusions: The child improved pelvic floor muscle strength and coordination and became fully continent of bowel in home and community settings.

What This Case Adds to Evidence-Based Practice: This case report demonstrates that pediatric age-appropriate educational and motivational tools (media, art, and interactive visualization activities) are readily available, economical, and effective when used in conjunction with current practice to decrease impairments and improve active participation and compliance during treatment of retentive encopresis in the pediatric population.

To describe the implementation and effectiveness of a multimodal therapeutic approach used to successfully treat a child with encopresis.

Physical Therapy Program, University of Jamestown, Fargo, North Dakota.

Correspondence: Brittany Anderson, PT, DPT, Physical Therapy Program, University of Jamestown, 4190 26th Ave South, Fargo, ND 58104 (brittany.anderson@uj.edu).

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citation appears in the printed text and is provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.pedpt.com).

There was no financial support other than the salaries of the investigator.

The author declares no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2019 Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy of the American Physical Therapy Association