Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Effect of Anodic tDCS Over Motor Cortex Versus Cerebellum in Cerebral Palsy

A Study Protocol

Villalta Santos, Lucas PT, MSc; Benite Palma Lopes, Jamile PT, MSc; Almeida Carvalho Duarte, Natália PT, PhD; Galli, Manuela PhD; Collange Grecco, Luanda André PT, PhD; Santos Oliveira, Claudia PT, PhD

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000626
RESEARCH PROTOCOL
Buy

Purpose: To compare the clinical and functional effects of treadmill training combined with anodic transcranial direct current stimulation (atDCS) on the primary motor cortex (Cz), specifically on the area of motor cortex representation of the lower limbs, and on the cerebellum (Cb) in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP).

Methods: Thirty children and adolescents with spastic CP will be randomly allocated in 3 groups: (1) treadmill training and atDCS on Cz; (2) treadmill training and atDCS on Cb; (3) treadmill training and sham tDCS on Cz. Evaluations of gait spatial-temporal parameters, functional mobility, functional balance, gross motor function, and functional performance will be performed 1 week before intervention and 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after intervention. Every 3 months the participants will cross over groups.

Discussion: This is a protocol for an intervention study comparing the clinical and functional effects of atDCS over Cz and Cb.

A proposed study to compare the clinical and functional effects of treadmill training combined with anodic transcranial direct current stimulation on the primary motor cortex, specifically on the area of motor cortex representation of the lower limbs, and on the cerebellum in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

Health Sciences (Mr Santos, Ms Lopes, and Drs Duarte and Oliveira), Santa Casa de São Paulo School of Medical Sciences, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; Vento Leste–Specialized Childcare Habilitation (Mr Santos and Dr Grecco), Sorocaba, SP, Brazil; Department of Electronic Information and Bioengineering (Dr Galli), Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy; Laboratory of Integrated Human Movements (Dr Grecco), Universidade de Sorocaba, Sorocaba, SP, Brazil; Center of Pediatric Neurostimulation (Dr Grecco), São Paulo, SP, Brazil; University Center of Anápolis (Dr Oliveira), Anápolis, GO, Brazil.

Correspondence: Lucas Villalta Santos, PT, MSc, Vento Leste–Specialized Childcare Habilitation, Rua do Zico 122, Jardim Santa Rosália, 18095-430, Sorocaba, SP, Brazil (lucasvillalta.s@gmail.com).

Grant Support: The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support from the Brazilian fostering agencies Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq) and Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES).

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

At the time this article was written, Lucas Villalta Santos was a master's student at the Postgraduate Program of Health Sciences, Santa Casa de São Paulo School of Medical Sciences, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2019 Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy of the American Physical Therapy Association