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Effects of Adaptive Bungee Trampolining for Children With Cerebral Palsy

A Single-Subject Study

Germain, Ashleigh M., BSc(Hons); Blackmore, A. Marie, PhD; Gibson, Noula, PhD; Newell, Becky, BSc; Williams, Sîan A., PhD

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000584
RESEARCH REPORTS
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Purpose: To assess effects of adaptive bungee trampoline training for children with cerebral palsy.

Methods: This was a single-subject intervention study, A-B-A, with 4 children aged 6 to 11 years. Measurements included muscle strength, balance, functional muscle strength, functional mobility, selected Gross Motor Function Measure items, heart rate, enjoyment, and for adverse effects—range of motion and spasticity. Goals were measured using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure.

Results: Lower limb muscle strength improved in 3 children, and balance and functional strength in 2 children. The child who was not walking increased sitting and supported standing times. All participants had clinically significant increases on the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Adherence and enjoyment were high, with no adverse effects.

Conclusion: Adaptive bungee trampoline training can improve strength, balance, and functional mobility in children with cerebral palsy.

To assess effects of adaptive bungee trampoline training for children with cerebral palsy.

The School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science (Ms Germain and Drs Gibson and Williams), Curtin University, Perth, Australia; Ability Centre (Drs Blackmore and Gibson), Perth, Australia; Kids in Motion Physiotherapy (Ms Newell), Perth, Australia.

Correspondence: Ashleigh M. Germain, BSc(Hons), School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Sciences, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845, Australia (ashleigh.germain@graduate.curtin.edu.au).

Grant Support: This study was supported by a grant from the School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science Early Career Research Grant, Curtin University.

At the time this article was written, Ashleigh Germain was a student studying her Bachelor of Science (Physiotherapy) Honors at Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citation appears in the printed text and is provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.pedpt.com).

The authors declare no conflicts of interest

Copyright © 2019 Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy of the American Physical Therapy Association