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Standing Tall

Feasibility of a Modified Ride-On Car That Encourages Standing

Logan, Samuel W., PhD; Catena, Michele Ann, PT, DPT; Sabet, Andrina, PT, ATP; Hospodar, Christina M., MS; Yohn, Haley, BS; Govindan, Aparna, BS; Galloway, James C., PT, PhD

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000568
CASE REPORTS
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Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of infants with Down syndrome to use a modified ride-on car with seated and standing modes.

Methods: Participants included 4 infants with Down syndrome. Families were asked to provide at least 8 minutes of modified ride-on car driving per day, at least 5 times per week throughout the 9-month intervention.

Results and Conclusions: Families demonstrated a variety of adherence rates to the intervention. Infants demonstrated independent activation of the modified ride-on car in seated and standing modes and enjoyed driving. The modified ride-on car intervention was feasible and warrants further testing to address barriers that influence adherence to the intervention.

The purpose of this study is to determine the feasibility of infants with Down syndrome using a modified ride-on car with seated and standing modes.

Social Mobility Lab (Drs Logan and Catena and Mss Hospodar, Yohn, and Govindan), College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon; Go Baby Go Lab (Ms Sabet), College of Health Sciences, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio; Pediatric Mobility Lab and Design Studio (Dr Galloway), Department of Physical Therapy and Biomechanics and Movement Sciences Program, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware.

Correspondence: Samuel W. Logan, PhD, Social Mobility Lab, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (sam.logan@oregonstate.edu).

Grant Support: The National Institutes of Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (R21HD078708) funded this study.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2019 Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy of the American Physical Therapy Association