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Effects of Instruction on Parent Competency During Infant Handling in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

Byrne, Eilish M., DSc; Sweeney, Jane K., PhD; Schwartz, Nancy, EdD; Umphred, Darcy, PhD; Constantinou, Janet, PhD

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000557
RESEARCH REPORTS
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Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of 3 different methods for delivering instruction on infant handling to parents in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

Methods: Ninety-six parents in the NICU received instruction. Parents were taught the same 3 infant-handling techniques after random assignment to the (1) direct, (2) video, or (3) written-pictorial instructional groups. After baseline competency assessment, parents received instruction according to their group. A masked evaluator assessed parent performance, and parents rated instructional effectiveness.

Results: All groups significantly improved handling performance. The direct and video groups performed 2 handling activities significantly better than the written-pictorial group. No significant differences were found between the direct and video groups. All groups perceived the instruction as effective.

Conclusions: Direct and video instructions are equally effective in teaching parents to perform simple whole motor tasks in the NICU, and parents welcome the instruction.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of 3 different methods for delivering instruction on infant handling to parents in the neonatal intensive care unit.

Department of Rehabilitation Services (Dr Byrne), Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford, Palo Alto, California; Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions (Dr Sweeney), Provo, Utah; Roosevelt School District (Dr Schwartz), Phoenix, Arizona; University of the Pacific (Dr Umphred), Stockton, California; Stanford Children's Health (Dr Constantinou), Palo Alto, California.

Correspondence: Eilish M. Byrne, DSc, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, 725 Welch Rd, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (ebyrne@stanfordchildrens.org).

This work was completed as part of doctoral requirements for a DSc degree awarded to Eilish M. Byrne from Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions, Provo, Utah.

Grant Support: Pediatric Research Fund, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citation appears in the printed text and is provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.pedpt.com).

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2019 Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy of the American Physical Therapy Association