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Effects of High-Intensity Interval Training on Fitness and Health in Youth With Physical Disabilities

Zwinkels, Maremka, PhD; Verschuren, Olaf, PhD; de Groot, Janke F., PhD; Backx, Frank J. G., MD, PhD; Wittink, Harriet, PhD; Visser-Meily, Anne, MD, PhD; Takken, Tim, PhD the Sport-2-Stay-Fit study group

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000560
RESEARCH REPORTS

Purpose: To investigate the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIT) on physical fitness and cardiometabolic health in youth with physical disabilities.

Methods: For this quasi-experimental study 70 participants were recruited from schools for special education and divided into runners and users of wheelchairs. HIT was performed for 8 weeks, twice a week, containing 30 seconds all-out exercises.

Results: Exercise adherence was 84.5%. Following HIT, there were improvements in anaerobic performance, agility, aerobic performance, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. There were no changes in peak oxygen uptake (

O2peak), arterial stiffness, body composition, lipid profile, and fasting glucose.

Conclusions: Both anaerobic and aerobic performance improved after HIT, with no changes in

O2peak. There were no effects on cardiometabolic health, except for a decrease in blood pressure.

To investigate the effects of high-intensity interval training on physical fitness and cardiometabolic health in youth with physical disabilities.

Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine (Drs Zwinkels, Verschuren, and Visser-Meily), Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht and De Hoogstraat Rehabilitation, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands; Department of Sports (Dr Zwinkels), De Hoogstraat Rehabilitation, Utrecht, the Netherlands; Department of Rehabilitation (Drs Backx and Visser-Meily), Physical Therapy Science & Sports, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands; University of Applied Sciences (Drs de Groot and Wittink), Utrecht, the Netherlands; Child Development and Exercise Center (Drs de Groot and Takken), University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands; Netherlands Institute for Healthcare Services Research (Dr de Groot), Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Correspondence: Maremka Zwinkels, PhD, Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands (m.zwinkels@dehoogstraat.nl).

Sport-2-Stay-Fit study group:

FJG Backx (Department of Rehabilitation, Physical Therapy Science and Sports, and Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands), JF de Groot (University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht, the Netherlands), T Takken (Child Development and Exercise Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands), DW Smits (Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine and Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, De Hoogstraat Rehabilitation and University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands), O Verschuren (Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine and Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, De Hoogstraat Rehabilitation and University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands), JMA Visser-Meily (Department of Rehabilitation, Physical Therapy Science and Sports, and Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine and Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, De Hoogstraat Rehabilitation and University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands), MJ Volman (Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of General and Special Education, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands), HW Wittink (University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht, the Netherlands), M Zwinkels (Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine and Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, De Hoogstraat Rehabilitation and University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands), T Nijboer (Department of Rehabilitation, Physical Therapy Science and Sports, and Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine and Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, De Hoogstraat Rehabilitation and University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands), R van de Schoof (University of Applied Sciences, Arnhem and Nijmegen, the Netherlands), G Steenweg (Windesheim University of Applied Sciences, Zwolle, the Netherlands)

Grant Support: This work was supported by an unconditional grant of the Dutch Organization of Health Research (ZONMW) [grant number 525001005].

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2019 Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy of the American Physical Therapy Association