Secondary Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Share this article on:

Adapted Dance Improves Motor Abilities and Participation in Children With Down Syndrome

A Pilot Study

McGuire, Michelle, PT, MPT; Long, Jason, PhD; Esbensen, Anna J., PhD; Bailes, Amy F., PT, PhD, PCS

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000559
RESEARCH REPORTS

Purpose: This pilot study measured effects of an adapted dance program on motor abilities and participation in children with Down syndrome (DS) and explored caregivers' qualitative feedback regarding its benefits.

Methods: Children with DS participated in 20 weekly 1-hour adapted dance sessions. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) Dimensions D and E were administered before and after the program. Caregivers completed a survey at the last session.

Results: Six children completed pre- and postassessments. Significant improvements were noted in GMFM-88 measures. Caregivers of 5 participants reported improved scores on the COPM that were not significant. Caregivers reported physical, cognitive, and emotional improvements.

Conclusions: This study supports use of an adapted dance program to improve motor abilities and participation in children with DS.

Video Abstract: For more insights from the authors, access Supplemental Digital Content 1, available at: http://links.lww.com/PPT/A231.

This pilot study measured effects of an adapted dance program on motor abilities and participation in children with Down syndrome and explored caregivers' qualitative feedback regarding its benefits.

Division of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy (Ms McGuire and Drs Long and Bailes) and Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics (Dr Esbensen), Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Correspondence: Michelle McGuire, PT, MPT, Division of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, MLC 4007, 3430 Burnet Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (michelle.mcguire@cchmc.org).

Grant Support: This study was supported by a grant from the Jack H. Rubinstein Foundation.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citation appears in the printed text and is provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.pedpt.com).

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2019 Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy of the American Physical Therapy Association