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Whole-Body Vibration Training Designed to Improve Functional Impairments After Pediatric Inpatient Anticancer Therapy: A Pilot Study

Rustler, Vanessa, MA; Prokop, Aram, MD; Baumann, Freerk T., PhD; Streckmann, Fiona, PhD; Bloch, Wilhelm, MD; Daeggelmann, Julia, PhD

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000536
RESEARCH REPORTS

Purpose: To assess a whole-body vibration (WBV) intervention for children after cancer treatment.

Methods: Eleven children after inpatient anticancer therapy participated in a 12-week supervised WBV intervention, which consisted of one 9- to 13-minute WBV session per week, with 5 to 9 minutes' overall vibration time. Feasibility was defined as the ability to participate in WBV training without reporting adverse events. The number of offered and completed training sessions, program acceptance, and measures of function were assessed.

Results: Nine participants completed the WBV intervention without any WBV-related adverse events. The adherence rate was 87.96%. Only minor side effects were reported and there was general program acceptance. We found indications that WBV has positive effects on knee extensor strength and active ankle dorsiflexion range of motion.

Conclusions: WBV was feasible, safe, and well received among children after inpatient anticancer therapy. No health deteriorations were observed. Positive effects need to be confirmed in future trials.

To primarily assess the potentials of whole body vibration with children after inpatient anticancer therapy. Feasibility, adherence, program acceptance, and fields of effectiveness were assessed.

Department of Molecular and Cellular Sports Medicine (Ms Rustler, Drs Streckmann and Daeggelmann, and Prof Bloch), Institute of Cardiovascular Research and Sports Medicine, German Sport University Cologne, Cologne, Germany; Pediatric Oncology/Hematology (Dr Prokop), Clinic for Children and Youth Medicine, Children's Hospital Amsterdamer Straße, Cologne, Germany; Department of Sport, Exercise and Health (Dr Streckmann), University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; Department of Internal Medicine (Dr Baumann), Center for Integrated Oncology Cologne/Bonn, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany.

Correspondence: Vanessa Rustler, MA, Department of Molecular and Cellular Sports Medicine, Institute of Cardiovascular Research and Sports Medicine, German Sport University, Am Sportpark Müngersdorf 6, 50933 Cologne, Germany (v.rustler@dshs-koeln.de).

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citation appears in the printed text and is provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.pedpt.com).

At the time this article was written, Vanessa Rustler was a PhD student (Sports Science) at the Institute of Cardiovascular Research and Sports Medicine, Department of Molecular and Cellular Sports Medicine, German Sport University, Cologne.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2018 Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy of the American Physical Therapy Association