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Abstract P-148: CARE OF CRITICALLY ILL CHILDREN IN GENERAL (ADULT) INTENSIVE CARE UNITS – A TALE OF THREE REGIONS

Mogan, S.1; Briggs, A.1; Cooper, A.2; Kashyap, A.3; Saxena, R.1

Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: June 2018 - Volume 19 - Issue 6S - p 94
doi: 10.1097/01.pcc.0000537605.07766.8e
Poster Abstracts
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1Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Paediatric Intensive Care/WATCh, Bristol, United Kingdom

2Birmingham Children’s Hospital, Paediatric Intensive Care/KIDS, Birmingham, United Kingdom

3The Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, The Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals/NECTAR, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom

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Aims & Objectives:

To study the demographics and epidemiology of children admitted to general (adult) intensive care units (GICUs) across the three regions in England, United Kingdom.

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Methods

A retrospective analysis of paediatric data submitted to the Intensive Care Audit and National Research Centre as part of a case mix programme of adult critical care in UK over one year (Jan –Dec 2015). The three regions studied were South-West England and Wales,The Midlands and North-East England.These are each served by their own specialist paediatric transport service called WATCh,KIDS and NECTAR respectively.

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Results

21,13 and17 GICUs admitted 229(222), 19(19) and 34(33)(number of children) paediatric critical illness episodes in the catchment areas of WATCh, KIDS and NECTAR respectively.Respiratory followed by neurological pathology were the biggest reason for GICU admission.No statistical difference was found between the overall median time spent in GICUs across the three regions (p =0.898)(see figure 1,2).Specialist transport team unavailability (35%) followed by inaccessibility of PICU bed(18%) at the time of referral were the most common reasons for admission to the local GICU (WATCh data).No correlation was found between the time spent in GICU and patient’s age (r=0.16) or distance of GICU from paediatric transport service base (r=0.152).

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Conclusions

A significant number of critically ill children were treated at local GICUs. Unavailability of specialist transport teams and PICU bed were the major reasons for this stay. A national audit of GICUs against the current PICS standards should be performed while determining merits (cost effectiveness, patient outcomes and family dynamics) of local vs specialised care.

Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies