Editor’s Choice Articles for November : Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

Journal Logo

Editor’s Choice

Editor’s Choice Articles for November

Tasker, Robert C. MBBS, MD, FRCP1–3

Author Information
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: November 2022 - Volume 23 - Issue 11 - p 857-859
doi: 10.1097/PCC.0000000000003102
  • Free

November 2022 from Pediatric Critical Care Medicine (PCCM): Start by reading my three Editor’s Choice articles (1−3) along with their accompanying editorials (4−6). Next, read about emergency medical care as this month’s educational theme highlighted in the section called PCCM Connections for Readers. Finally, before you move on to the other content in PCCM, read this month’s PCCM Narrative essay.

WHAT CAN WE LEARN ABOUT INDIVIDUAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL WORK-LIFE FACTORS AND MORAL DISTRESS IN PICU PRACTITIONERS?

Lamiani G, Barlascini L, Borghi L, et al; Open Doors in INtensive care (ODIN) Study group 2: Moral Distress in the Italian PICUs: The Role of Individual and Organizational Factors (1).

My first Editor’s Choice article comes from the Open Doors in Intensive Care (ODIN) study group comprising 23 PICUs in Italy. The ODIN group surveyed 635 of 874 eligible clinicians (75%) with the purpose of exploring the interplay between individual factors (i.e., sex, profession, years of experience, spiritual/religious belief, and resilience) and organizational factors (i.e., number of admissions, mortality rate, nurse-to-patient ratio, and parent presence) on staff moral distress (1). The accompanying editorial is thoughtful and informative (4).

WHAT ARE THE OUTCOMES OF EXTRACORPOREAL MEMBRANE OXYGENATION (ECMO) IN CHILDREN WITH PRE-EXISTING DEFICITS IN NEUROLOGY OR DISABILITY?

Dante AS, Carroll MK, Ng DK, et al; Pediatric ECMO (PediECMO) subgroup of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators (PALISI) Network and the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO): Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Outcomes in Children With Preexisting Neurologic Disorders or Neurofunctional Disability (2).

My next Editor’s Choice article comes from the eight U.S. hospitals reporting to the Pediatric ECMO Outcomes Registry (PEDECOR) over a period of almost 8 years. The authors aimed to determine the prevalence and nature of pre-ECMO neurologic disorders or disability, and to investigate any association between such disorders with subsequent unfavorable outcomes (2). The accompanying editorial comes from experienced PCCM authors at centers in Boston, Sydney, and Toronto (5). Please read their insightful analysis of the PEDECOR report along with the article, and refer to recent PCCM articles on communication around the time of ECMO (7−9).

WHAT ABOUT STANDARDIZING OUTCOME MEASURES FOR SURVIVORS OF PEDIATRIC CRITICAL ILLNESS?

Pinto NP, Maddux AB, Dervan LA, et al; POST-PICU Investigators of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators (PALISI) Network and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network (CPCCRN): A Core Outcome Measurement Set for Pediatric Critical Care (3).

My third Editor’s Choice article is a multi-author, international Delphi consensus from the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators (PALISI) Pediatric Outcomes Studies after PICU (POST-PICU) investigators and the U.S. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network (CPCCRN). In this article, 35 expert investigators delineate measures to evaluate each of the domains in the PICU Core Outcome Sets (COS) (3). Our editorialists provide important discussion, and the hope is that by using the PALISI/CPCCRN POST-PICU consensus on COS, investigators will enable comparability across future research studies (6).

PCCM CONNECTIONS FOR READERS

The connections material this month focuses on the educational theme of delivering the best in emergency medical care. Each article comes with an editorial. First, there are two articles about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (10−13). One is about calcium administration for in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) in children with heart disease from the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation registry (10), and the other is from the ICU-RESUScitation Project dataset. This work looks at the timing of the COVID-19 pandemic, which resulted in adaptations in our system of care for performing CPR, and temporal associations with CPR quality and outcomes after IHCA (12). Second in the theme of emergency care is an article about burns and mechanical ventilation (14,15). Third, we have an article about high-dose midazolam for refractory status epilepticus (16,17).

Having read this materials on emergency care in our specialty (10−17), take the time to appreciate the report from Australia and New Zealand (18), with an editorial discussant from South Africa (19), describing national organization and the delivery of centralized PICU practice. Finally, before moving on to the other content that interests you, read the Narrative Essay called “Waves” (20); a reflection about new starts, stress, burnout, and the need to support each other.

REFERENCES

1. Lamiani G, Barlascini L, Borghi L, et al.; Open Doors in INtensive care (ODIN) Study group 2: Moral distress in the Italian PICUs: The role of individual and organizational factors. Pediatr Crit Care Med 2022; 23:872–880
2. Dante AS, Carroll MK, Ng DK, et al.; Pediatric ECMO (PediECMO) subgroup of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators (PALISI) Network and the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO): Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation outcomes in children with preexisting neurologic disorders or neurofunctional disability. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022; 23:881–892
3. Pinto NP, Maddux AB, Dervan LA, et al.; POST-PICU Investigators of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators (PALISI) Network and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network (CPCCRN): A core outcome measurement set for pediatric critical care. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022; 23:893–907
4. Gouda SR, Morrison W: Moral distress in Italian PICUs–Are healthcare organizations listening? Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022; 23:940–942
5. Moynihan KM, Basu S, Kirsch R: Discretion over discrimination: Towards good decisions for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation outcome use in patients with neurological comorbidities. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022; 23:943–946
6. LaRosa JM, Scholefield BR, Kudchadkar SP: Measure to improve like PROs: Patient-related outcomes in survivors of pediatric critical illness. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022; 23:946–949
7. Moynihan KM, Dorste A, Siegel BD, et al.: Decision-making, ethics, and end-of-life care in pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: A comprehensive narrative review. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2021; 22:806−812
8. Moynihan KM, Purol N, Alexander PMA, et al.: A communication guide for pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2021; 22:832−841
9. Moynihan KM, Jansen M, Siegel BD, et al.: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation candidacy decisions: An argument for a process-based longitudinal approach. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022; 23:e434−e439
10. Dhillon GS, Kleinman ME, Staffa SJ, et al.; American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation (GWTG-R) Investigators: Calcium administration during cardiopulmonary resuscitation for in-hospital cardiac arrest in children with heart disease is associated with worse survival–A report from the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation (GWTG-R) registry. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022; 23:860–871
11. Savorgnan F, Acosta S: Calcium chloride is given to sicker patients during cardiopulmonary resuscitation events. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022; 23:938–940
12. Morgan RW, Wolfe HA, Reeder RW, et al.: The temporal association of the COVID-19 pandemic and pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality and outcomes. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022; 23:908–918
13. Madden K: The more things changed: Preservation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality despite pandemic impacts on the PICU population. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022; 23:949–951
14. Garren BN, Akhondi-Asl A, DePamphilis MA, et al.: Factors associated with mechanical ventilation duration in pediatric burn patients in a regional burn center in the U.S. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022; 23:e536–e540
15. Woodruff AG, Bass AL, McCrory MC: Navigating the multiverse: Heterogeneity in pediatric burn care in the United States. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022; 23:958–960
16. Daniels ZS, Srdanovic N, Rychlik K, et al.: High-dose midazolam for pediatric refractory status epilepticus: A single-center retrospective study. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022; 23:929–935
17. Peariso K: Midazolam use in pediatric refractory status epilepticus: The point of diminishing returns. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022; 23:954–956
18. Slater A, Beca J, Croston E, et al.; Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Pediatric Study Group and Centre for Outcomes and Resource Evaluation: Association between centralization and outcome for children admitted to intensive care in Australia and New Zealand: A population-based cohort study. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022; 23:919–928
19. Argent AC: Centralization of pediatric critical care services: It seems to work in Australia and New Zealand. Is it right for all? Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022; 23:952−954
20. Mills MF: Waves. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022; 23:936–937
Copyright © 2022 by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies