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Poster Abstracts

Abstract P-369: PAEDIATRIC PATIENTS AND THEIR PARENTS PREFER WIRELESS MONITORING IN HOSPITAL

Sultan, S.1; Macdonald, A.1; Loughead, R.1; Fule, B.1; Duncan, H.1

Author Information
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: June 2018 - Volume 19 - Issue 6S - p 160
doi: 10.1097/01.pcc.0000537826.91667.db
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Aims & Objectives:

Introduction: Advances in technology have made wireless monitoring of vital signs possible. Patients’ prefer wireless data collection in home telemetry but there has been reluctance to participate in wireless monitoring research in hospital because of device design and discomfort.

Aim: To explore children and their parents’ views and preferences on wireless monitoring of heart-rate, respiratory-rate and pulse-oxymetry when compared to standard monitoring.

Methods

A subgroup of parents and children participating in the Real-time Adaptive Predictive Indicator of Deterioration (RAPID) study were approached to complete feedback questionnaires. The children were wearing wireless LifeTouch heart and respiratory rate monitor and the wireless Nonin WristOx2 pulse-oximeter in addition to standard monitoring.

Quantitative data questions included: size, discomfort and experience of wearing the devices, qualitative free text responses were also collected.

Results

120 questionnaires were collected from 25 children and 86 parents. Majority of the respondents preferred wireless to routine monitoring, feeling normal and reassured with only 4 that expressed worry.

Sensors were reported to be easy to apply and use (Table 1). Negative free text responses (n=78) highlighted the pulse-oximeter size and discomfort. Positive comments (n=91) reflected freedom, reassurance, reduced disturbance and potential innovative contribution to care delivery.

Conclusions

Wireless monitoring is acceptable to parents, children and young people and is preferred to routine monitoring. These findings support implementing wireless monitoring in hospital, however technical issues may limit the target population.

Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies