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Poster Abstracts

Abstract P-339: PARENTAL STRESS IS NOT INCREASED BY CONTINUOUS WIRELESS MONITORING DURING TRANSITION FROM PAEDIATRIC INTENSIVE CARE TO WARD

West, J.1; Macdonald, A.1; Sultan, S.1; Fule, B.1; Duncan, H.1

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Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: June 2018 - Volume 19 - Issue 6S - p 150
doi: 10.1097/01.pcc.0000537796.64744.25
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Aims & Objectives:

Parents of children in Paediatric Intensive Care (PIC) have identified monitor sights and sounds as one of many sources of stress. With recent improvements in technology continuous wireless monitoring is becoming available to patients in a ward environment.

Aim: To assess whether levels and sources of parental stress change when wireless monitoring is added to standard care during transition from PIC to ward care.

Methods

In a nested observational study parents consented to answer questionnaires about stressors related to their child’s current clinical care (excluding underlying diagnosis and prognosis).

The validated Parental Stressor Scales (PSS) PICU was assessed at PIC discharge, following ward admission and when discharge ready. PICU: PSS total and 7 subscale scores were adjusted per participant to account for different sample sizes at time points. A higher score indicates more stress.

Results

Parents of 66 children with a mean age of 44.9 months completed 175 PSS PICUs. Cases (n=47) had wireless monitoring in addition to routine monitoring and controls (n=138) had routine monitoring only. Total PSS PICU reduced over time from 1.58 (PIC discharge) to 1.41 (ward admission) and 1.07 (discharge ready) as did all subscales (Figure 1.)

Conclusions

Continuous wireless monitoring in a ward environment doesn’t increase parental stress. Monitor sights and sounds are the major stressor in transition from PIC to discharge readiness. Sounds of monitors and sudden alarms should be reduced to reduce parental stress.

Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies