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Abstract P-090: RAPID – IMPACT AND SOURCES OF PARENTAL STRESS RELATED TO MONITORING OF THEIR CHILD IN HOSPITAL: A QUALITATIVE STUDY

Spry, J.1; Duncan, H.1

Author Information
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: June 2018 - Volume 19 - Issue 6S - p 76
doi: 10.1097/01.pcc.0000537547.07873.cb
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Aims & Objectives:

Advances in technology have made wireless monitoring of paediatric vital signs possible. This study was performed during the Real-time Adaptive Predictive Indicator of Deterioration (RAPID) study to understand the impact and sources of stress for parents when their child is monitored using standard systems and RAPID wireless monitoring.

Methods

This was an in-depth qualitative study. Purposive sampling identified parents whose children had been through Paediatric Intensive Care (PIC) and were being cared for on one of the two cardiac wards. Parents provided valid informed consent to an audio recorded semi-structured interview.

Results

Eleven patient’s parents took part (2 fathers, 9 mothers). The patients ranged from 3 months old to 14 years and 7 months old. Six of the patients experienced the RAPID wireless monitoring. This table displays the main themes (from thematic analysis):

Hopes for monitoring development included it being wireless, having a central monitoring station on the wards, increased portability and remote access. Parents were also hopeful that future monitoring systems would be ‘intelligent’ with alarms specific to an individual child’s need and remove stressful false alarms.

Conclusions

The results of this study enable us to better understand the experiences and monitoring needs of parents whose children are hospitalised with complex health needs. There is a clear need for monitoring equipment, interface and the way it is used to be designed better. Parents have provided guidance about how this can be done –this will be key as we move forward to ensure that design changes meet the needs of patients and their families.

Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies