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Abstract PD-032: NEW GRADUATE NURSES IN PEDIATRIC CRITICAL CARE WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

Dryden-Palmer, K.1; Trinier, R.1

Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: June 2018 - Volume 19 - Issue 6S - p 40
doi: 10.1097/01.pcc.0000537434.20149.54
Poster Discussion Abstracts
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1Hospital for Sick Children, Critical Care, Toronto, Canada

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Aims & Objectives:

Direct recruitment of new graduate nurses (NGN) to critical care (CC) can address shortfalls in nurse staffing. The one and three-year outcomes of our learner-centered program for NGN integration to CC have been previously presented (2011). We describe the 10-year outcomes of the graduates of this education program.

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Methods

A mixed method evaluation of program outcomes was performed using survey, semi-structured interview and administrative record review. Main outcomes were retention, career achievement and NGN satisfaction. Eligible participants were practicing nurses who had participated in the NGN program and 3-year evaluation. Three and ten year results were compared. Descriptive statistical and thematic results are presented.

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Results

Of the nurses eligible for the 10-year survey 57% (28/49) participated. Hospital retention was 83% (43/52) at 3-years, and 57% (27/47) at 10-years. Retention in ICU was 71% (37/52) at 3-years, and 35% (18/52) at 10-years. 67% (12/18) of those still practicing in CC intend to remain. Participants identified reasons for leaving as; life choices, ongoing education and new roles in the organization including leadership positions such as advanced practice, senior manager and educator. 82% (23/28) were satisfied with their NGN experience and would choose this experience again.

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Conclusions

Retention in NGN was similar to non-NGN hires. NGN direct recruitment to CC is a viable staffing strategy with high NGN satisfaction over the long term. An integrated learner-centred orientation program with graduated clinical supervision was positively impactful on NGN professional development in the graduate, early and mid-career stages.

©2018The Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies