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Abstract PCCLB-10: WIRELESS MONITORING OF PHYSIOLOGY CAN BE ACHIEVED OVER 80% OF INTENDED MONITORING TIME – RESULTS OF THE RAPID STUDY

Fule, B.1; Macdonald, A.2; Sultan, S.2; Loughead, R.2; Duncan, H.2

Author Information
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: June 2018 - Volume 19 - Issue 6S - p 246
doi: 10.1097/01.pcc.0000538095.75481.5a
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Aims & Objectives:

Technology for wireless monitoring of physiology is available. Adult studies reported data transmission below 40% of intended monitoring time (IMT).

We have conducted the first wireless study in children, the Real-time Adaptive Predicitve Indicator of Deterioration (RAPID) study to

- assess feasibility of wireless monitoring system in ward environment

- develop and test smart alarm algorithms for the detection of deteriorations

Aim: to assess transmission of wireless physiologic data in the recruits of the RAPID study.

Methods

The study was approved by REC and parental consent was gained. We have collected data on patients admitted to two paediatric cardiology wards in a specialist children’s hospital.

Heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate was measured by a wireless single channel ECG device (Isansys LifeTouch), SpO2 by a wireless pulse-oximeter (Nonin WristOx2). Recruits were allowed to run multiple sessions during their enrollment (during a single hospital admission).

Monitoring sessions were analised per recruitment for connectivity and data transmission. We defined data transmission as readings on HR between 45–250/min for LifeTouch and SpO2 60–100% for WristOx.

Acceptable data transmission was considered >60% of IMT (valid session running during ward admission).

Results

We have collected 5 631 687 minutes of IMT from 1240 recruits. Data transmission was achieved in 81.9% for LifeTouch and 53.7% for WristOx2.

Conclusions

Wireless monitoring can be a reliable alternative for standard monitoring in a ward environment. Further analises required to assess validity and spread of transmitted data and to establish costs and economic impact. SpO2 transmission rates need to improve.

Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies