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Abstract O-29: ENTERAL PROTEIN SUPPLEMENTATION IN CRITICALLY ILL CHILDREN A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED PILOT STUDY

Hauschild, D.B.1; Oliveira, L.D.A.1; Ventura, J.C.1; Farias, M.S.2; Barbosa, E.2; Bresolin, N.L.3; Mehta, N.M.4; Moreno, Y.M.F.5

Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: June 2018 - Volume 19 - Issue 6S - p 13
doi: 10.1097/01.pcc.0000537371.64516.f3
Oral Abstracts
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1Federal University of Santa Catarina, Postgraduate Program in Nutrition, Florianópolis SC, Brazil

2Joana de Gusmão Children’s Hospital, Nutrition, Florianópolis, Brazil

3Joana de Gusmão Children’s Hospital, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Florianópolis, Brazil

4Boston Children’s Hospital, Division of Critical Care Medicine- Department of Anesthesiology- Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Boston, USA

5Federal University of Santa Catarina, Nutrition, Florianópolis SC, Brazil

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Aims & Objectives:

Protein supplementation may be associated with improved clinical outcomes in critically ill children. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and tolerance of protein supplementation, and its impact on clinical outcomes in critically ill children on enteral nutrition (EN).

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Methods

Pilot, three-arm, controlled trial in critically ill children. Children on mechanic ventilation and on EN therapy were randomized to one of 2 interventional groups; polymeric and oligomeric protein supplementation, or control group receiving standard nutritional therapy. In the interventional groups, the protein supplement was administered to reach the prescribed protein goal by Day 4. Demographic characteristics and clinical outcomes were recorded. EN interruptions, increase in stool frequency and abdominal distension were evaluated as signs of intolerance of the intervention. Blood urea and creatinine values were recorded.

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Results

Among 363 patients admitted, 70 were eligible, and 34 were. At baseline there were no differences between the groups (Table 1). The number of EN interruption and ≥3 defecations/day were similar between groups. Abdominal distension was present in 30% of the control, 12.5% of the polymeric and 0% of the oligomeric group. There were no increases in serum urea and creatinine values in all 3 groups. There were no differences in clinical outcomes between the 3 groups (Table 2).

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Conclusions

Enteral protein supplementation with oligomeric or polymeric modules is safe and well tolerated in critically ill children. Multicenter study with larger sample size is necessary to examine the impact of protein supplementation on clinical outcomes.

Trial registration: Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials n°RBR-3h4x97

©2018The Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies