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Comorbid Conditions in Neonates With Congenital Heart Disease

Krishnamurthy, Ganga MBBS; Ratner, Veniamin MD; Bacha, Emile MD; Aspelund, Gudrun MD

doi: 10.1097/PCC.0000000000000832
Congenital Heart Disease
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Objectives: The objectives of this review are to discuss the pathophysiology, clinical impact and treatment of major noncardiac anomalies, and prematurity in infants with congenital heart disease.

Data Source: MEDLINE and PubMed.

Conclusion: Mortality risk is significantly higher in patients with congenital heart disease and associated anomalies compared with those in whom the heart defect occurs in isolation. Although most noncardiac structural anomalies do not require surgery in the neonatal period, several require surgery for survival. Management of such infants poses multiple challenges. Premature infants with congenital heart disease face challenges imposed by their immature organ systems, which are susceptible to injury or altered function by congenital heart disease and abnormal circulatory physiology independent of congenital heart disease. For optimal outcomes in premature infants or in infants with multiple congenital anomalies, a collaborative interdisciplinary approach is necessary.

1Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology and Perinatology, Neonatal Cardiac Care, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, New York, NY.

2Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology and Perinatology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York- Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, New York, NY.

3Department of Surgery, Congenital and Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, New York, NY.

4Department of Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, New York, NY.

The authors have disclosed that they do not have any potential conflicts of interest.

For information regarding this article, E-mail: gk2008@cumc.columbia.edu

©2016The Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies