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Reassessment of H&E stained clot specimens and immunohistochemistry of phosphorylated Stat5 for histological diagnosis of MDS/MPN

Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki1; Aini, Wulamujiang1; Hiratsuka, Takuya2

Pathology - Journal of the RCPA: December 2015 - Volume 47 - Issue 7 - p 673–677
doi: 10.1097/PAT.0000000000000328
HAEMATOLOGY/ANATOMICAL PATHOLOGY

Summary: Few studies have comprehensively analysed histopathological findings of bone marrow clots for diagnosis of haematopoietic cell dysplasia. In particular, a limited number of studies have assessed the use of haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, which is generally considered less informative than May-Giemsa staining. In the current study, the utility of bone marrow clot specimens for diagnosis was examined using H&E staining and immunohistochemistry. Patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN), including chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML), atypical chronic myeloid leukaemia (aCML) lacking Philadelphia chromosome, and juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia (JMML), were selected for histological evaluation. H&E stained specimens were advantageous for observation of atypical basophilic staining of the cytoplasm and nucleus related to dysplasia. This finding was significantly supported for both MDS and MDS/MPN (p < 0.05 versus May-Giemsa staining); therefore, we concluded that H&E staining could be used for identification of dysplastic cells. In addition, despite the loss of tissue structure, phosphorylated Stat5 immunostaining was sufficiently useful for the observation of myelodysplastic blasts. Thus, clot specimens are useful for diagnosis of haematopoietic dysplasia by pathologists.

1Department of Pathology and Center for Anatomical, Pathological, and Forensic Medical Research, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Yoshidakonoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto

2Department of Pathology and Biology of Diseases, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University Hospital, Yoshidakonoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan

Address for correspondence: Tatsuaki Tsuruyama, MD, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Yoshidakonoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan. E-mail: tsuruyam@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp

Received 3 February, 2015

Revised 9 July, 2015

Accepted 12 July, 2015

© 2015 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia
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