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Nm23-H1 Protein Immunoreactivity In Cancers Of The Gallbladder, Extrahepatic Bile Ducts And Ampulla Of Vater.

Lee Soon C.; Pirdas-Zivcic, Anne
Pathology - Journal of the RCPA: 1994
doi: 10.1080/00313029400169172
Original Article: PDF Only
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: Immunohistochemical expression of the nm23-H1 protein was investigated in carcinoma of the gallbladder (n = 13), common bile duct (n = 5) and ampulla of Vater (n = 7) using the monoclonal antibody, NM 301 (Molecular Oncology Inc.). This was compared with cases of chronic cholecystitis (n = 11) and preneoplastic lesions of the gallbladder (n = 4) and ampulla (n = 3). Absent or weak nm23-H1 protein immunoreactivity was found in most (67%) of the poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the gallbladder and in half of the cases of moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas. The difference in nm23-H1 protein immunostaining between gallbladder carcinoma and chronic cholecystitis was statistically significant (p = 0.0022; X2 test). Significant correlation was found between prolonged patient survival periods and nm23-H1 immunoreactivity in gallbladder carcinomas (R = 0.687, p = 0.01, linear regression analysis; r = 0.652, p = 0.016, Spearman's rank test). Most of the gallbladder dysplasias and adenomas had no reduction in nm23-H1 protein immunoreactivity. All common bile duct carcinomas, most (67%) ampullary carcinomas in situ and some (43%) ampullary carcinomas had moderate to strong nm23-H1 immunostaining. In summary, low nm23-H1 protein immunoreactivity was found more frequently in gall-bladder carcinomas than in chronic cholecystitis and was associated with reduced patient survival. The differences in nm23-H1 protein immunoreactivity in common bile duct and ampullary carcinomas suggest that these tumors have a different molecular origin to gallbladder cancers.

(C) 1994 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia

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