Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

The medial temporal lobe in nociception

a meta-analytic and functional connectivity study

Ayoub, Lizbeth J.a,b,c; Barnett, Alexanderd; Leboucher, Aziliza; Golosky, Mitchella; McAndrews, Mary Patb,e; Seminowicz, David A.f,g; Moayedi, Massieha,c,h,*

doi: 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001519
Research Paper
Buy
SDC

Recent neuroimaging studies implicate the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in nociception and pain modulation. Here, we aim to identify which subregions of the MTL are involved in human pain and to test its connectivity in a cohort of chronic low-back pain patients (CBP). We conducted 2 coordinate-based meta-analyses to determine which regions within the MTL showed consistent spatial patterns of functional activation (1) in response to experimental pain in healthy participants and (2) in chronic pain compared with healthy participants. We followed PRISMA guidelines and performed activation likelihood estimate (ALE) meta-analyses. The first meta-analysis revealed consistent activation in the right anterior hippocampus (right antHC), parahippocampal gyrus, and amygdala. The second meta-analysis revealed consistently less activation in patients' right antHC, compared with healthy participants. We then conducted a seed-to-voxel resting state functional connectivity of the right antHC seed with the rest of the brain in 77 CBP and 79 age-matched healthy participants. We found that CBP had significantly weaker antHC functional connectivity to the medial prefrontal cortex compared with healthy participants. Taken together, these data indicate that the antHC has abnormally lower activity in chronic pain and reduced connectivity to the medial prefrontal cortex in CBP. Future studies should investigate the specific role of the antHC in the development and management of chronic pain.

Medial temporal lobe activity is investigated in meta-analyses of experimental and chronic pain. Abnormal hippocampal connectivity is found in chronic low-back pain patients.

aFaculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

bSystems Neuroscience Division, Krembil Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada

cUniversity of Toronto Centre for the Study of Pain, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

dCenter for Neuroscience, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA, United States

eDepartment of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

fDepartment of Neural and Pain Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Maryland Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, United States

gCenter to Advance Chronic Pain Research, University of Maryland Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, United States

hDepartment of Dentistry, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada

Corresponding author. Address: Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Room 543, 124 Edward St, Toronto, ON M5G 1G6, Canada. Tel.: 416-864-8235. E-mail address: m.moayedi@dentistry.utoronto.ca (M. Moayedi).

Sponsorships or competing interests that may be relevant to content are disclosed at the end of this article.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.painjournalonline.com).

Received January 22, 2018

Received in revised form January 23, 2019

Accepted February 01, 2019

© 2019 International Association for the Study of Pain
You currently do not have access to this article

To access this article:

Note: If your society membership provides full-access, you may need to login on your society website