Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Distraction from chronic pain during a pain-inducing activity is associated with greater post-activity pain

Goubert, Liesbeta,b,∗; Crombez, Geerta,b; Eccleston, Christopherc; Devulder, Jacquesd

doi: 10.1016/j.pain.2004.03.034
Articles
Buy

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of distraction from pain during and after a pain-inducing lifting task in a sample of chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients. Fifty-two CLBP patients (25 males, 27 females; mean age=46.30 years) performed a pain-inducing lifting task twice, once alone and once with a simultaneous cognitive distraction task. The results revealed that (1) distraction had no effect upon self-reported pain during the lifting task, (2) distraction had a paradoxical effect of more pain immediately after the lifting task, (3) both pain-related fear and pain catastrophizing did not moderate the effects of distraction on pain, but (4) catastrophic thinking about pain during the lifting task was related to more vigilance to pain and less engagement in the distracting task. Further investigation of the catastrophizing data showed that the effect of catastrophizing about pain during the lifting task on the cognitive distraction task was mediated by the amount of attention paid to pain. Clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

aDepartment of Experimental-Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Henri Dunantlaan 2, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium

bResearch Institute for Psychology and Health, Utrecht, The Netherlands

cPain Management Unit, University of Bath, Bath, UK

dDepartment of Anesthesia, Pain Clinic, University Hospital of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium

Corresponding author. Address: Department of Experimental-Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Henri Dunantlaan 2, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. Tel.: +32-9-264-62-62; fax: +32-9-264-64-89

E-mail: liesbet.goubert@ugent.be

Submitted October 30, 2003; revised March 12, 2004; accepted March 22, 2004.

© 2004 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
You currently do not have access to this article

To access this article:

Note: If your society membership provides full-access, you may need to login on your society website