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OVS ANNOUNCES

doi: 10.1097/OPX.0b013e31823e6ba4
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Most Contact Lens Wearers are Not Compliant with Practitioner Guidelines

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Patients who think they are following contact lens care and wear guidelines really are not. The study of two different groups of contact lens wearers reveals that a significant proportion of patients exhibited actual non-compliant behavior despite acknowledged awareness of risk. Although most patients consider themselves to be complying with guidelines, essentially all contact lens wearing patients exhibit behavioral risk taking non-compliance with guidelines for lens wear and care. (p. 1402)

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The Risks of Reusing Daily Disposal Contacts Lenses

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Our authors estimated levels of contamination of daily disposable lenses stored overnight in the blister pack solution of 20 regular daily disposable lens users. Each returned their used lenses to the blister pack saline and submitted these for culture on five occasions. All but one submitted at least one set of contaminated lenses. The cultures predominantly yielded staphylococci and organisms contaminating saline mirrored those from the lenses. They found the reuse of lenses was common and that not all users complied with hand washing. The authors call for better education of daily disposable lens wearers. (p. 1409)

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Case Cleaning Procedures Alter Osmolarity and pH

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Our authors found that for a range of multipurpose solutions, and two hydrogen peroxide systems, variations in both pH and osmolarity are dependent on both the length of time in the storage case and different drying techniques. However, they leave it for future studies to determine whether these changes might affect bacterial growth, lens parameters, or subject comfort during contact lens wear. (p. 1414)

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Sodium Salicylate Effectively Reduces Acanthamoebel Attachment to Contact Lenses

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Disinfection efficacy of care solutions is often limited. Our authors' study suggests that 10 mM of sodium salicylate would be an effective minimum concentration for reducing amoebal attachment to hydrogel contact lenses. The authors' fascinating video clip in our on-line publication (Supplemental Digital Content, available at http://links.lww.com/OPX/A71) reveals that Acanthamoeba trophozoites on a contact lens are not stationary and move about on the lens surface. (p. 1422)

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Overnight Contact Lens Wear Decreases Tear Meniscus Volume

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The tear meniscus is valuable for the non-invasive assessment of tear quantity. Previous studies have shown increased tear meniscus volume upon awakening. But eye closure provides a markedly different environment for soft contact lenses compared with the open eye environment. Now our authors show that when extended wear lenses are worn at night, upon wakening there is a relative decrease in tear meniscus volume measured by optical coherence tomography and decreased tear film stability. Although the tear meniscus returns to the level of non-contact lens wearers in about an hour, the authors relate these initial changes upon awakening to lesser eye comfort. (p. 1433)

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A New Lubricant Eye Drop for Dry Eyes

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The tear film plays a central role in the integrity of the ocular surface. The authors found that in patients with dry eye syndrome associated with glaucoma treatment, a lubricant eye drop solution containing l-carnitine, with a low osmolarity, improved stability and quality of the tear film. They measured this with fluorescein break up time and an ocular protection index. (p. 1439)

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Intraocular Pressure Not Implicated in Myopia Development

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Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured in the ethnically diverse Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) cohort. Children with low/moderate myopia had higher IOP than those with high hyperopia but differences were not clinically meaningful (<1 mm Hg). Relationships between IOP and age, ethnicity, sex, and measurement protocol were complicated by significant interactions between these parameters. The take-home message? Longitudinal analysis of children before and after myopia onset showed changes in IOP over time that varied by ethnicity, but the differences were too small to suggest a role for IOP in the onset of myopia. (p. 1445)

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Interocular Symmetry in Myopic Anisometropia

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Although significantly different in axial length, non-amblyopic anisometropic eyes display a high degree of symmetry with the fellow eyes for a range of anterior eye biometrics and optical parameters. Despite the high degree of interocular symmetry between dominant and non-dominant eyes, for higher levels of anisometropia, the more myopic eye tends to be the dominant sighting eye suggesting that ocular dominance may be associated with refractive error development. (p. 1454)

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Wavefront-Guided and Wavefront-Optimized LASIK Compared

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Our authors found that both have excellent efficacy, safety, and predictability. Nevertheless, they feel that wavefront-guided treatments may have an advantage over wavefront-optimized treatments in patients who have greater preoperative higher order aberrations. (p. 1463)

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Cup Size Predicts Future Functional Change in Early Glaucoma

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Glaucoma is typically monitored using a combination of structural and functional tests, but the best way to combine these sources of information remains unclear. The authors say this depends on the purpose! On the basis of the longitudinal testing of 129 patients with early or suspected glaucoma, they find that current functional status is best related to neuroretinal rim area, whereas the future rate of functional change is better predicted by cup area or cup volume. (p. 1470)

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Novel Pupil-Based Perimetry in AMD

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The authors describe the first application of multifocal pupillographic objective perimetry (mfPOP)—a novel, rapid, non-invasive test—to patients with unilateral exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD significantly decreased mean pupil constriction amplitudes and delayed the peak pupil response, with the size of these effects increasing with severity of disease. Good diagnostic power was obtained for both the exudative and fellow non-exudative eyes. (p. 1477)

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Involving Caregivers in a Low Vision Patient-Centered Self-Management Program

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Providing caregivers with information and skills to manage low vision is important. Our authors feel theirs is the first study to evaluate a low vision patient-centered group-based self-management program on caregivers. The caregivers did not benefit from attending a patient-centered program. They conclude that caregivers need different strategies than programs that are patient-centered. (p. 1486)

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Reduced Physical Activity and Psychosocial Status Associated with Vision Variability in RP

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Short-term variability in PC-based tests of visual acuity (VA), contrast sensitivity (CS), and visual field (VF) is greater for self-administration at home by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients. They found that increased VA and VF variability was predicted largely by increased RP severity. VF variability was greater for patients who reported less physical activity or increased negative psychosocial states; this is important to consider in clinical examination of RP patients. (p. 1496)

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Caution Urged on Reliability of the DEM Test

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This study evaluated the repeatability of the Developmental Eye Movement Test (DEM) on 181, 6 to 12 year old children with normal visual acuity, binocular vision, and accommodation. Within- and between-session repeatability for vertical and horizontal adjusted time, errors, and ratio scores revealed that the ratio and error scores show poor repeatability for all age groups. The authors caution clinicians about using the DEM test in isolation to accurately diagnose and monitor the treatment of an eye movement dysfunction. (p. 1507)

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Most Cerebral Palsy Patients have Ocular Abnormalities

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The authors found that of 88 consecutive cerebral palsy (CP) patients, with a complete ophthalmological examination before orthopedic surgery, 78 patients (89%) had ocular abnormalities. The objective vision-impairing ocular abnormalities and vertical strabismus were significantly associated with poor gross motor function before orthopedic surgery. A full ophthalmic evaluation is suggested in CP patients, especially in those with poor motor function. (p. 1520)

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Correcting Astigmatism in Eyepieces

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The authors describe a low-cost device for correcting an individual's astigmatism within the eyepiece. It consists of two equal ophthalmic cylindrical lenses, which through rotation generates a variable amount of astigmatism up to twice the power of each cylinder. They describe the theory behind the astigmatism compensator, its calibration, and examples of use in a microscope. (p. 1524)

Supplemental Digital Content

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© 2011 American Academy of Optometry