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OVS Announces

OVS ANNOUNCES

Optometry and Vision Science: October 2011 - Volume 88 - Issue 10 - p A1-A3
doi: 10.1097/OPX.0b013e318233fa5b
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IN THIS ISSUE:

Extending the Range of Acuity Testing for the Severely Visually Impaired

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Grating tests of visual acuity and contrast sensitivity are increasingly used in clinical trials involving severe vision loss. They can offer advantages over traditional letter optotype tests. Our authors confirmed that computer-driven grating tests appear to be reliable and capable of evaluating vision that falls outside of the range of standard clinical letter chart tests. The tests may be useful to monitor disease progression or visual changes during clinical trials for advanced retinitis pigmentosa and other retinal diseases. (p. 1153)

Where Do They Stare for Best Vision?

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Most patients suffering from end-stage AMD do not look at you when they want to see you; instead they use a preferred retinal locus. Most studies have measured this monocularly. For a large number of study patients with central field loss in both eyes, the authors found that binocular eccentric gaze direction was most frequently to the right, and it was the gaze of the better-seeing eye that determined the binocular eccentric gaze. (p. 1164)

Non-Polar Lipid Deposits on Contact Lenses and Their Removal

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Daily wear contact lenses adsorb tear film components, including lipids and proteins. The authors found that, for soft lens wearers who were symptomatic of dry eye, a care system used for 2 weeks preserved with Polyquad and Aldox removed higher amounts of the predominant non-polar lipid, cholesterol oleate, from senofilcon A contact lenses than a peroxide-based system. (p. 1172)

Contact Lens Case Cleaning and Contamination

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Our authors suggest, from their comparative research, that bacterial contamination of contact lens cases is more effectively reduced by incorporating “rubbing and wiping” of lens cases into existing manufacturer guidelines. (p. 1180)

Novel “Wettability” Instrumentation for Contact Lens Assessment

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Our authors propose a new instrument to quantify both the in vivo contact lens contact angle and the “index of spreading” to characterize “wettability” for an on-eye contact lens. The authors provide repeatability data for these parameters measured with their instrument. (p. 1188)

Contact Lenses to Improve Panoramic Vision and Potentially Curtail Myopia Progression

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Vision correction using contact lenses is aimed primarily at improving central vision. Visual experience, however, depends also on panoramic vision of objects over a wide field of view as when driving, walking, or playing sports. However, our authors point out that the design of contact lenses does not take peripheral vision into account. We now know peripheral vision appears important for the development of foveal refractive error. The authors note that there is room for improvement in the quality of panoramic vision by improved designs of contact lenses that may also help curtail the progression of myopia by improving the focusing of light over a large area of the retina. (p. 1196)

Assessing Tear Film in Contact Lens Wear Using OCT

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Lid parallel conjuctival fold (LIPCOF) morphology in eyes with, and after wearing, contact lenses is important in assessing the tear film in contact lens wear. The authors use Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) to quantitatively assess LIPCOF and its relationship to tear film properties. The authors suggest that OCT could be a rapid non-invasive tool for imaging LIPCOF in contact lens patients. (p. 1206)

Aging Tears and Dry Eye Patients

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Our authors found that, using OCT to measure upper and lower tear menisci height and area, tear menisci decreased with age in healthy eyes. The decrease of the total tear meniscus volume in healthy subjects was 1.0% per year. However, the tear volume in age-matched dry eye subjects was significantly lower than those in the healthy group. (p. 1214)

Quickly Revealing the Abnormal Cornea

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Several novel indices derived from corneal images of placido disks allow our authors to suggest that they can be rapidly incorporated into any corneal topographic systems. They are reported to allow excellent accuracy in distinguishing between normal and keratoconic corneas. (p. 1220)

Corneal Asphericity Altered in High Myopia

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The corneal asphericity coefficient Q describes the rate of curvature variation of the cornea from its center to the periphery and specifies the type of conicoid that best represents its shape. Our authors find that in Chinese eyes the asphericity and asymmetry, particularly in highly myopic eyes, is important to consider in corneal ablation surgery. (p. 1232)

How Repeatable are Corneal Layer Measures?

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Measurement of different corneal layer thicknesses is now possible with the confocal scanning microscope. Our authors found good repeatability with the Nidek Confoscan 4 (z-ring) for central corneal thickness and stromal thickness, but not for thinner corneal layers. (p. 1240)

Subtle Stray Light and Vision Effects of Corneal Refractive Therapy

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Corneal refractive therapy (CRT) is an alternative to refractive surgery, but what happens to stray light and contrast vision with the therapy? Our authors found that stray light was reduced after 1 month of therapy but, strangely, this was not correlated with the observed changes in mesopic contrast sensitivity. (p. 1245)

Pseudomonas Keratitis Following LASIK

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A case of Pseudomonas keratitis 4 years after LASIK suggests this treatment as a predisposing factor for bacterial keratitis even years after surgery. Treatment led to clinical improvement with resolution of the corneal infiltrate. (p. 1252)

Novel Functional MRI Measures Treatment Effectiveness with Wet AMD

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A patient with bilateral neovascular AMD was scanned using functional MRI before and during treatment with intravitreal antiangiogenic injections (ranibizumab). Behavioral measures (acuity and perimetry) are largely dependent on fixation stability and consequently vary depending on the criticality of fixation for that vision measure. However, functional MRI is shown by our authors to provide objective measures of brain signals independent of fixation. Our authors find that their new functional MRI measures parallel recovery of visual function, contrary to recent reports that visual cortex degenerates subsequent to retinal lesions. (p. 1255)

Retinal Angiomatosis and Cystoid Macular Edema Reported in Cogan Syndrome

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In 1945 David G. Cogan first described, as a separate clinical entity, the association between non-syphilitic interstitial keratitis and audiovestibular symptoms which resembled Meniere's disease. Our authors report a first account of Cogan's syndrome with peripheral retinal angiomatosis and cystoid macular edema. In doing so, they highlight the variable presentation of this rare syndrome and the positive impact of early diagnosis. (p. 1262)

© 2011 American Academy of Optometry