Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

OVS Announces

OVS ANNOUNCES

Optometry and Vision Science: June 2010 - Volume 87 - Issue 6 - p A1-A2
doi: 10.1097/OPX.0b013e3181e47e85
  • Free

IN THIS ISSUE:

Slightly Reduced Contrast Significantly Impairs Night Driving

Figure
Figure:
Figure.
Figure
Figure:
Editor's Choice open access

Our authors show that despite relatively good visual acuity, both minor blur and some contrast reduction (simulating cataracts) significantly reduces the ability to recognize road signs, avoid road hazards, and see pedestrians when driving at night. Even though the cataract and blur conditions were matched for visual acuity, the driving performance was worse for the cataract condition. (p. 379)

Contact Lens Wettability and Biocompatibility are Related

Figure
Figure:
Figure.

“Biocompatibility” reflects the interaction between a biomaterial and biological cells and is influenced by the surface characteristics of the biomaterial. The authors' review confirms that, in general, biocompatibility is reflected in the wettability of a biomaterial when measured by its contact angle. This applies to blood contacting devices, dental impressions, intraocular lenses, and hydrogel and silicone hydrogel lens materials. (p. 387)

A Curious Increased Prevalence of High Astigmatism for Children in a Native American Tribe

Figure
Figure:
Figure.

Infants have a high prevalence of astigmatism >2 D, which decreases in the second year of life. Curiously, unlike the patterns seen in other populations, the prevalence of high astigmatism in children of a native American tribe (Tohono O'odham) increases again between ages 2 and 3 years to reach prevalence levels near that seen in infancy. This prevalence remains until at least the age of 8 years. (p. 400)

The “Great Outdoors” Protects Against Myopia Development?

Figure
Figure:
Figure.

In agreement with other recent studies, nonmyopic children spend more hours of sports/outdoor activity during the school year, which may protect against myopia development. The authors' new finding is the high number of sports/outdoor activity hours for both myopes and nonmyopes during the summer break, which they propose may be related to their finding of slowed eye growth in all children during these 3 months. (p. 406)

Children and Adults Alike in Wearing Gas Permeable and Soft Contact Lenses

Figure
Figure:
Figure.

The authors report on outcomes such as comfort, wearing time, and symptoms for children wearing gas permeable and soft contact lens (SCL). The children were more likely to remain in their original treatment assignment if they were assigned to SCLs rather than gas permeables. Although they adapted to both lens types, long-term adaptation to SCLs occurred more frequently. (p. 414)

Compliance, Comfort, and Vision Go Together for Silicone Hydrogels

Figure
Figure:
Figure.

In a relatively large study, patients who were compliant with the manufacturers replacement frequency recommendations had better “end of day” comfort and vision than others. (p. 421)

Both Contact Lens Hydrophobicity and Roughness Increase Bacterial Adhesion

Figure
Figure:
Figure.

Our authors wanted to assess whether hydrogel contact lens surface hydrophobicity and roughness affected Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion. They found that both increased hydrophobicity and increased roughness were associated with greater Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion. (p. 426)

LASIK and Orthokeratology Produce Differences on Paracentral Cornea!

Figure
Figure:
Figure.

Corneal refractive therapy with LASIK or orthokeratology induces a shift in anterior corneal curvature in the paracentral area surrounding the treatment zone but with marked differences in each treatment. Are there implications for myopia progression? (p. 432)

Properly Characterizing Wettability of Contact Lenses

Figure
Figure:
Figure.

For clear vision and wearing comfort, human tears must spread and remain stable atop a contact lens surface. Low contact angles enhance wettability, but surface tension is also important. To properly characterize surface wettability of a soft contact lens, our authors report an experimental paradigm to measure contact angle and surface tension concurrently. (p. 440)

A Serious Complication with a Refractive Multifocal IOL

Figure
Figure:
Figure.

Retino-cortical processing of visual information is impaired in patients with peripheral vestibular disorders such as Meniere disease. This case report suggests that these patients are not good candidates for multifocal intraocular lens implantation. (p. 448)

© 2010 American Academy of Optometry