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OVS Announces

OVS Announces

Optometry and Vision Science: November 2008 - Volume 85 - Issue 11 -
doi: 10.1097/OPX.0b013e31818b8f6d
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IN THIS ISSUE:

Hidden losses of central visual field in glaucoma?

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Our authors have taken newly available data on the number of retinal ganglion cell receptive fields per visual field area and related this to sensitivity in perimetry. Their surprising result suggests that perimetry distorts the distribution of neural damage, underestimating damage in the central field in glaucoma. They also believe it accounts for the relative sensitivity of the pattern ERG compared with perimetry in ocular hypertension. (p. 1036)

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Editor's choice open access

Can test learning over 8 years with annual perimetry hide glaucomatous vision loss?

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Our authors say it can. They found that 8 years of annual perimetry on 80 patients with suspected or early glaucoma, revealed long term learning effects. The authors suggest that this should be accounted for to avoid underestimating progressive vision loss. (p. 1043)

Visual attention predicts mobility performance in low vision

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Attentional visual fields (also referred to as useful field of view) are known to be trainable. The authors' finding that these attentional fields predict mobility of low vision patients raises the question of the relationship between useful field of view training and orientation and mobility training in low vision. (p. 1049)

Restoring mobility through retinal prostheses for the blind.

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Can low resolution retinal prostheses, developed to restore some functional vision in the blind, be useful in orientation and mobility? The authors simulated prosthetic vision for virtual maze navigation and noted that in their simulations some mobility tasks in way-finding are indeed helped. (p. 1057)

How do epicanthal folds impact an observer's judgment of gaze?

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Western and Eastern college-age observers judged the direction of gaze from eyes with and without epicanthal folds differently. When the gazers' heads were straight, observers judged eye alignment best with lateral gaze when the gazer had the eye appearance common within the observers' own country. (p. 1064)

Amblyopia, patching and self-esteem in children

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The authors' study demonstrates that children with amblyopia scored lower on their self-perception of social acceptance by their peers than non-amblyopic children. This was closely related to a history of patching. The study result reminds clinicians of the benefits of limiting patching to times of the day when the child has less interaction with social peers. (p. 1074)

Desktop publishing of custom near visual acuity charts

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Desktop computer-based distance visual acuity (VA) measurements are accurate and reliable, but computer-based near VA measurements have not been attempted. This is mainly due to the limited spatial resolution of computer monitors. The authors solve this problem using desktop publishing to create validated printed custom near VA charts of Sloan optotypes. (p. 1082)

A Chinese version of the National Eye Institute Visual Function questionnaire

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A Chinese version of the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ-25) yielded satisfactory reliability and validity, comparable with the English version. However, as with the English version, the Chinese version has significant misfits of some items revealed by Rasch analysis; this raises concerns about using the complete questionnaires in future studies. (p. 1091)

Customizing lenses for both accommodative and binocularity accuracy for children with myopia

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Many clinicians use bifocal lenses and progressive addition lenses (PALs) in an attempt to control or reduce the rate of myopia progression in children. The authors note that a common +2 D addition for children typically creates exophoria and fixation disparity out of the normal range. They advocate, and give guidance on, selecting progressive addition lenses that maximize both accommodative accuracy and binocularity for an individual patient. (p. 1100)

Costs of vision impairment in childhood and youth

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Although children and youth with vision impairment face a lifetime of vision-related costs, little is known about the scale and composition of these costs. This innovative study is the first to collect such data with detailed diaries over a 12-month period; it provides valuable insights. (p. 1106)

Can granulomatous poststreptococcal uveitis be unilateral?

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This case of presumptive unilateral, granulomatous uveitis subsequent to streptococcal pharyngitis serves to underscore that although poststreptococcal uveitis (PSU) generally manifests as a bilateral non-granulomatous uveitis, it may demonstrate variability in severity, intensity, recalcitrance and symmetry of presentation. (p. 1110)

© 2008 American Academy of Optometry